Health

“You can’t regret life”

May 26, 2017 by Stephen J. Thorne

Paul Franklin wasn’t going to let the loss of his legs change him Story and photography by Stephen J. Thorne For two years, Master Corporal Paul Franklin kept pictures on the wall of his cubicle in Land Force Western Area Headquarters at CFB Edmonton—they were photos of the Taliban fighters who took his legs. His…

Health

“It crushed me”

May 19, 2017 by Stephen J. Thorne

Nine years ago, Mark Campbell was the high-value target of a Taliban remotely detonated bomb. Today, he says, “I lost my legs for all the right reasons.” Story and photography by Stephen J. Thorne The toughest part of Mark Campbell’s nine-year ordeal was being separated—not from his legs by a Taliban bomb, but from the…

Subscribe
MBP
Classified Ads
Navy

A quiet victory in the Gulf

May 17, 2017 by Marc Milner

When Canada declared war on Germany in September 1939, the most immediate threat to the country was an attack on its shipping. That fear was so palpable that when periscopes were soon “sighted” in the St. Lawrence River, no one was surprised. A “submarine diviner” with a plumb-bob and a chart of the river was…

Military History

Canada’s first foreign war

May 15, 2017 by Mark Zuehlke

On Feb. 11, 1900, the 1,039-strong Canadian contingent recently deployed to South Africa joined a powerful British column at Graspan, on the Cape Colony’s eastern boundary with the Boer Orange Free State. The following day, under a blazing sun with temperatures peaking at 46°C, the 2nd (Special Service) Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment (RCR) marched through…

LATEST YOUTUBE VIDEOS

  • Leonard Cohen recites “In Flanders Fields”
  • Military Moments | Japanese Canadian Internment
  • Military Moments | Battle of Vimy Ridge
  • Military Moments | Battle of Beaumont-Hamel
  • Legion Magazine Presents: Battle of the Atlantic

Subscribe to our channel

Our vulnerable Arctic

May 24, 2017 by Stephen J. Thorne
  The Arctic’s vast expanse and stirring emptiness are rarely top of mind but always at the core of Canadians’ collective soul. It is a land of breathtaking beauty, profound challenges and stark contrasts. Nearly 40 per cent of Canadian territory lies above the Arctic Circle, yet only about one per cent of the...

A quiet victory in the Gulf

May 17, 2017 by Marc Milner
When Canada declared war on Germany in September 1939, the most immediate threat to the country was an attack on its shipping. That fear was so palpable that when periscopes were soon “sighted” in the St. Lawrence River, no one was surprised. A “submarine diviner” with a plumb-bob and a chart of the river...

What to do about North Korea?

May 17, 2017 by Stephen J. Thorne
Canada went to war in 1950 because North Korea’s invasion of South Korea was a clear affront to the principles of the still-fledgling United Nations and was viewed as a potential stepping stone to more serious confrontation in Eastern Europe. In fact, for decades it wasn’t considered a war at all, but a “police...

John McCrae’s baptism of fire

May 17, 2017 by Don Gillmor
The Boer War started the year John McCrae graduated from the University of Toronto’s medical school. He had served as an officer in the military reserves and had a romantic view of war, partly gleaned from Rudyard Kipling’s vivid accounts of war as British adventure. He had pasted Kipling’s poem “The White Man’s Burden”...

Canada’s first foreign war

May 15, 2017 by Mark Zuehlke
On Feb. 11, 1900, the 1,039-strong Canadian contingent recently deployed to South Africa joined a powerful British column at Graspan, on the Cape Colony’s eastern boundary with the Boer Orange Free State. The following day, under a blazing sun with temperatures peaking at 46°C, the 2nd (Special Service) Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment (RCR) marched...

Hard spending decisions needed

May 15, 2017 by David J. Bercuson
Lee Berthiaume, writing for the Canadian Press last fall, referred to “internal Defence Department documents” in a story about the need to spend billions, beginning soon, to upgrade Canada’s submarines. He referred to those documents, obtained through the Access to Information Act, in estimating the cost of upgrading the submarines at $1.5 to $3...

Halting the blood loss

May 15, 2017 by Sharon Adams
Combat soldiers who have suffered battlefield wounds have never had a better chance of survival than they have today. Due to improvements in battlefield medicine and evacuation, 92 per cent of U.S. soldiers wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan made it home alive, compared to about 75 per cent in the Vietnam War. Former Canadian Armed...

The arbitrary age of 65

May 15, 2017 by Legion Magazine
Ill and injured veterans are still waiting for clarity from the federal government on how it intends to provide them with lifelong financial security. The federal budget tabled on March 22 included some new spending for veterans and their families, but it left a big one—lifetime payments—unresolved. The budget promised $624 million in new funds...

Pushing the boundaries

May 12, 2017 by Stephen J. Thorne
After paratrooper Lorne Ford was wounded in a friendly fire incident, he spent years fighting against survivor’s guilt Story and photography by Stephen J. Thorne Don’t tell Sergeant Lorne Ford he’s had it rough, because every day that he gets out of bed, puts on his uniform and goes to work, he counts his...

Testing North American air space

May 10, 2017 by Stephen J. Thorne
Recent approaches by Russian Cold War-era bombers off Alaska and the Canadian Arctic mark a significant escalation in such activity representing the most concentrated batch of Russian long-range missions in some time. But in all the years that Soviet and, later, Russian aircraft have embarked on such missions, they’ve never breached Canadian or American...

Dan’s best friend

May 5, 2017 by Stephen J. Thorne
PORTRAIT OF INSPIRATION Bubba’s owner, Daniel Boudreault, says his service dog is his best medicine Story and photography by Stephen J. Thorne Daniel Boudreault is on medications for a host of psychological problems, largely related to his service with the Canadian military overseas. He is supported by psychologists, psychiatrists, doctors and nurses. But it’s...

Sajjan under fire

May 3, 2017 by Stephen J. Thorne
Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan is under fire for comments he made overstating his role in one of the biggest battles of the war in Afghanistan. But what were his transgressions, really, and what price should he pay, if any? Sajjan apologized quickly and unequivocally for calling himself the “architect” of Operation Medusa, a Canadian-led...

Face to Face

May 1, 2017 by Legion Magazine
In 1899, the press in English Canada had a cause that filled the front pages. Britain was preparing to fight a war in South Africa against the Boer republics of the Orange Free State and the Transvaal, ostensibly to protect the rights of uitlanders. These mainly British migrant workers were men who had come...
MORE ARTICLES
Last Post

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

SEARCH