Witness to Remembrance

Learning history where history was made. That’s the focus of this new Legion Magazine post aimed at opening up discussion on visits to Canadian memorials and battlefields. From France and Belgium to Italy, Hong Kong, Korea and the high seas, there are many sacred locations, including some right here at home, where Canadians served and died. Year after year they are visited by thousands of Canadians who want to honour this service and sacrifice. Collectively, these witnesses to remembrance represent a cross-section of Canadian society, from young students to families of service personnel to war veterans. We are please to present this online forum as a way of encouraging their discussion.

Witness to Remembrance

The Night In The Trenches 2013 – Jesse

“I think the night in the trenches is a very good way to help kids remember how much the people who served Canada sacrificed. This year I couldn’t participate because I had hockey in Fort McMurray. I have done it in past years and it showed me, how much the veterans really sacrificed for Canada’s freedom.” Jesse
Witness to Remembrance

The Night In The Trenches 2013 – Jennifer

“I think the Eaglesham School ‘Night in the Trenches’ is an amazing opportunity that should be offered to every Canadian student. I, myself have not participated in the trenches before, but I have helped with the event. It’s truly touching to see young people wanting to experience what our veterans have. No one made them go out there, they chose to. I think that honestly enhances the freedom we have as Canadians. The Freedom Our Veterans Fought For.” Jennifer
Witness to Remembrance

The Night In The Trenches 2013 – Eric

“I took part in the annual Remembrance Day trench digging for my fifth and final year. I thought it was well put together, meaningful and respectful to the veterans and the fallen. I enjoy every aspect of it and I hope it continues for a long time. I would like to see more take part but it is a physically and mentally challenging experience. Laying in a hole in -20 Celsius isn’t the most fun to have but it always ends up bringing smiles and we make a good time of it.” Eric
Witness to Remembrance

The Night In The Trenches 2013 – Mikhaila

“I did not do it because I believe I could not last the night. Also I had people say I could not last the night. This year I went to the presentation for the first time. It was good to see the community involved with the slideshow. The people helped make it more personal. I enjoyed watching after each person from the area announced and people clapped(ed:  she meant that when we introduced our living veterans at the Remembrance Day ceremony). I am tempted to go next year, but I know to be well prepared and to bring personal snacks. I enjoy watching people respect the military and Mr. McKay being able to share his experience with many others.” Mikhaila
Witness to Remembrance

The Night In The Trenches 2013 – Kimberly

“I chose not to participate in the trenches this year or the years previous for two reasons. 1. I am far too wimpy and would freeze my buns off, as well as let my trench-mate down. By probably digging a severely crappy trench. 2. I do not support fighting under any circumstances. Call me a pacifist, but glorifying war by honouring the people partaking in it in front of the children, the future of our world, is a bad idea in my imagination.” However, I do believe that the Ceremony and Trench Project do a good job at revealing some of the horrors of war. Perhaps if we spent the night in a Jewish Ghetto or in tunnels in South Asia, I’d participate as it would do a better job of showing the disgusting reality of the human reality of self-slaughter.” Kimberly
Witness to Remembrance

The Night In The Trenches 2013 – Casey

“Spending a night in the trenches is an experience I will never forget. Many children my age see Remembrance Day as just another day off school and not as a time to reflect on and remember those who served for our country. Digging a massive hole in the ground is definitely easier said than done. It got very cold at night so I was thankful that I brought very warm clothing. My favorite part about digging the trenches was going on a walk around patrol at night. I enjoyed learning how to use one of the military radios. I’m glad we were able to participate in the Remembrance Day ceremony because I’m truly thankful and appreciative of all the men and women who served for our country so that we may be free. I have no regrets going on the trenches trip and will definitely do it in years to come.”...

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