Uncategorized

Help for those living with concussion
Health, Military Health Matters, Uncategorized

Help for those living with concussion

The long days and nights of pandemic social isolation are tough on military veterans with symptoms of traumatic brain injury, especially those living alone—and particularly those who shrugged off seemingly minor head injuries and haven’t connected their symptoms to concussion. The structure of daily life has been disrupted; the radio and television get a harder workout, resulting in headaches from glare and blare. It’s easier to drift off into a nap, with disastrous results for an already disrupted sleep routine. Friends and colleagues are less available to provide company and help negotiate the new rules that can be confusing for those with memory problems and brain fog. People around them seem to be walking on eggshells, but sufferers shrug that off, too: of course, they’re more ir...
On track, part 1
Front Lines, Uncategorized

On track, part 1

Story and photography by Stephen J. Thorne The National Youth Track and Field Championships took place Aug. 9-11, 2019, in Sydney, N.S., where 721 athletes—314 of them sponsored by The Royal Canadian Legion—competed. The event, hosted by Cape Breton University and the Legion’s Breton Branch, also involved 160 coaches, 150 officials and more than 600 volunteers. The LeRoy Washburn Award for the top female athlete went to Jaeland Cummings from BC/Yukon Command and the Jack Stenhouse Award for the top male athlete went to Ryan Jacklin from Ontario Command. To see results, click here Below is a selection of images of the athletes in action.
CPR reaches completion
Military Milestones, Uncategorized

CPR reaches completion

The dream of an iron road running from sea to sea was realized at 9:22 a.m. on Nov. 7, 1885, when financier Donald Smith drove the final spike connecting the east and west arms of the Canadian Pacific Railway at Craigellachie, B.C., in a pass through the Rocky Mountains west of Revelstoke. For British Columbians, it was high time, since a transcontinental railway, the inducement to become the westernmost province, was promised in 1871. When the troubled project was not complete by the original deadline of 1881, and with some B.C. politicians threatening to secede, the CPR took over the troubled project and completed it in just five years. There were actually four last spikes. A ceremonial silver spike never made it to the ceremony, so the spike that was used was identical to the othe...
Taking solace in the <br>not-so-little things
Front Lines, Uncategorized

Taking solace in the
not-so-little things

Sometimes, the little things make a big difference. Sometimes the little things add up. And sometimes the little things are all you have. It might be wise to remember this as Canadian troops ramp up their peace operations in Mali, where they are conducting medical evacuations on behalf of United Nations forces trying to intervene in an al-Qaida-driven insurgency. Some say Canada should be doing more. Some say we shouldn’t be there at all. But unlike some previous deployments, Canada’s response in Mali is measured and expectations appear to be contained. Take, for example, Afghanistan. A recent New York Times study revealed that the Taliban control or contest 61 per cent of Afghan districts—largely, the numbers suggest, because opposing government forces are much smaller and weake...

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