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Remembrance

85th New Brunswick Convention

Dedication and determination in New Brunswick Delegates met for the 85th New Brunswick Command convention at the Beaverbrook Kin Centre in Miramichi, N.B., on Sept.

An unexpected crowd

    Reverend Andrew Gates looked out over the large crowd gathered around the cenotaph on the grounds of the British Columbia legislature in Victoria.

Afghan vets honoured with art exhibits

Canadian and other coalition troops wounded during the war in Afghanistan are front and centre in two exhibitions currently showing in France and Canada.   

A welcome return

An estimated 15,000 people converged on the National War Memorial in Ottawa on Nov. 11, a welcome return after the near-empty streets of the previous

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Cannons and Cutlasses: The Great Lakes Battles

During the War of 1812, the inland seas of North America—the Great Lakes—were the setting for major maritime operations. Both Britain and the United States devoted tremendous energy and resources to creating naval forces on the lakes as water provided the best means of transporting and supplying land forces. Naval bases sprung up almost overnight and ship construction was maintained at a dizzying pace. At the outbreak of war, the U.S. had exactly one warship on the Great Lakes, a 16-gun vessel on Lake Ontario. By 1814, it had 28 major warships, the largest mounting 58 guns. The Royal Navy expanded in a similar proportion. In 1814 the U.S. Navy constructed and commissioned a warship on Lake Champlain in the amazing time of 33 days, while Britain built a battleship, HMS St. Lawrence, on Lake Ontario that was larger than HMS Victory, Nelson’s flagship at Trafalgar.

Medical care in the wars of the future

The challenges of battlefield medicine are about to change for Western allied nations, now that the focus of threats has migrated to China, Russia, Iran and North

The lost nuke of British Columbia

In September 1949, U.S. President Harry Truman announced the Soviet Union had detonated an atomic device. Early in the following year, U.S. air crews were

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