Canada’s man in Havana

The story of a young Canadian diplomat spying on the Soviets in Cuba on behalf of the CIA with the blessing of our prime minister is improbable, but no more so than its context. This was the Cuban missile crisis of 1962, when the world came within a hair’s breadth of a nuclear holocaust....
  • The search for an old contemptible

    July 4, 2016 by Murray Brewster
    It all started with a random tweet. My first inclination had been to ignore it because rule No. 1 on Twitter, as a journalist, is to avoid being baited personally. The sender, however, did not appear to be an aggrieved reader, nor a partisan hack...
  • How I survived at the Somme

    March 1, 2016 by Christopher J.A. Morry
      A Newfoundland Regiment soldier recounts the 1916 tragedy that was Beaumont-Hamel Introduction by Christopher J.A. Morry  |  Diary by Howard L. Morry Howard L. Morry, my grandfather, was a fifth-generation Newfoundlander. His immigrant ancestor, Matthew Morry, was a self-made fish merchant from Devon, England, plying...
  • Pips off the port beam

    September 1, 2015 by Ronald Simpson
    Thomas Simpson was instrumental in the sinking of U-1302, a battle he remembers with regret to this day       My only living grandparent is Thomas Joseph Simpson, and he is my inspiration. He served in the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) during the Battle...
  • The poet and the poppy

    May 18, 2015 by Dianne Graves
    Book and cigar in hand, John McCrae relaxes at the holiday home of friends at Kennebunkport, Maine, where he spent a vacation in September 1903. Guelph Civic Museum/M1968X.436.3   A century ago, Canadian medical officer John McCrae saw “every horror that war had,” including the...
  • Canada’s gift of liberty

    May 10, 2015 by Gerard Triesman
    As a three-year-old, I had no real comprehension of the horrific circumstances in which I lived. The hand grenade, carelessly discarded by a Nazi soldier, attracted my attention. I was playing outside my home in the Netherlands in 1944 when I saw it lying on...
  • In mid-October 1918, my grandfather, Donald Mainland, was near Maurois, France, with the Fort Garry Horse. A welterweight—150 pounds, five feet six inches, with sandy hair and grey eyes, Donald was older than some of the men in the trenches. His 25th birthday had just...
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