Editorial

The key is adaptability
Editorial, Our Veterans

The key is adaptability

Kudos are in order. For the past 16 months—the COVID era—The Royal Canadian Legion has made every effort to prevent interruption to the services it provides to veterans, and it has shown remarkable adaptability. Back in the pre-pandemic days, Legion branches served as second homes to many in communities across Canada. Places to gather in groups, socialize, reminisce, grumble, throw darts, get support—and do good work for others. Branches generate new members and new revenue. And they are fundamental to the grassroots federalist model by which the Legion operates. Thank goodness it won’t be much longer before they are all reopened and operating at capacity.  But looking back, the lockdown closure of branches dealt quite a body blow to the core of this national institution.  Digital ini...
Zero homeless?
Editorial, Our Veterans

Zero homeless?

London, Ont., recently declared it has functionally eradicated veteran homelessness within its city limits.  “Functional zero veteran homelessness” is a status designated by the Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness. It means the number of homeless veterans is less than, or equal to, the number of veterans the city has proven it can house in a month. The alliance’s Built for Zero Canada campaign has endorsed London as the first Canadian community to attain that distinction. “Safe and affordable housing is a right for everyone, especially brave women and men who have so selflessly served our country,” said Mayor Ed Holder.   Homelessness likely affects 3,000 to 5,000 of Canada’s nearly 650,000 veterans, according to a 2019 report to Parliament by the House of Commons Standing Co...
Sombre coverage
Editorial, News

Sombre coverage

The Legionary cover headline in September 1939 was sombre—Canada at War—and the words ‘The Fighting Man’s Magazine’ were added to the masthead.   The magazine’s coverage now included Legion programs for personnel at home and overseas, which included education services, recreation huts, publications, sports and mobile kitchens. The Legionary also had its own overseas correspondent, a Legion welfare officer attached to the 1st Canadian Infantry Division. The July 1940 issue included “The Nazi Bluff,” an essay debunking German invincibility. Improvements and gaps in veterans’ benefits and services continued to be covered, and coverage also reflected concerns of a new generation navigating the bureaucracy to obtain land grants, re-establishment credits, financial aid for higher educa...
Honouring centenarians
Editorial, Our Veterans

Honouring centenarians

Never before have so many Canadians reached the grand old age of 100, and their compatriots are noticing. Among the last of “The Greatest Generation,” many are veterans of the Second World War and Korea, and they have been feted with tributes, news coverage, mailing campaigns, even parades. There’s Fred Arsenault of Toronto (March 6), Harold Freeston of Langley, B.C. (June 24), Armour Hanna of Toronto (July 1), Bill Marr of South Surrey, B.C. (Aug. 25), Winnifred Magor of Calgary (Nov. 9), Robert Spencer of Ottawa (Nov. 9), Gordon Piers of Nicola Valley, B.C. (Nov. 10), David Thiessen of Abbotsford, B.C. (Nov. 11), Jack Coles of Qualicum Beach, B.C. (Nov. 16), Peter Chance of Sidney, B.C. (Nov. 24), Monica Christensen of Toronto (Nov. 26), and George Wilson of Lethbridge, Alta. (Dec....
New partner offers car and home insurance
Editorial

New partner offers car and home insurance

Royal Canadian Legion members and their families can benefit from an exclusive discount on home and car insurance from the Legion’s newest partner in the Member Benefits Package (MBP), belairdirect. These discounts are on top of any other discounts, savings and benefits customers are already eligible for from belairdirect. In addition, members also receive enhanced coverage on residential insurance at no additional cost. Besides saving money, members purchasing insurance from belairdirect will be supporting The Royal Canadian Legion, which in turn supports services and programs for veterans. The program is available now to members residing in British Columbia (home insurance only), Alberta, Ontario and Quebec. To get started, call 1-833-294-2911. For members residing in other regions,...
A new voice for veterans
Editorial

A new voice for veterans

The Legionary debuted on May 15, 1926, establishing a publishing tradition that has tracked the successes and challenges facing Canada’s veterans—and kept readers informed through war and peace and turbulent times.  Early covers featured portraits of military dignitaries. Inside, dense text delivered news of policies and progress on improved support for veterans, commemorative events and stories about military history. In the Roaring Twenties, the magazine reflected readers’ widening interests and lighter mood. Fiction found a place next to history. Covers were more colourful and pages were spiced with humour, including cartoons about a war braggart and the between-wars generation. A sombre look and tone prevailed during the Great Depression. The Christmas editorial in 1930 urged rea...

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