Editorial

Sombre coverage
Editorial, News

Sombre coverage

The Legionary cover headline in September 1939 was sombre—Canada at War—and the words ‘The Fighting Man’s Magazine’ were added to the masthead.   The magazine’s coverage now included Legion programs for personnel at home and overseas, which included education services, recreation huts, publications, sports and mobile kitchens. The Legionary also had its own overseas correspondent, a Legion welfare officer attached to the 1st Canadian Infantry Division. The July 1940 issue included “The Nazi Bluff,” an essay debunking German invincibility. Improvements and gaps in veterans’ benefits and services continued to be covered, and coverage also reflected concerns of a new generation navigating the bureaucracy to obtain land grants, re-establishment credits, financial aid for higher educa...
Honouring centenarians
Editorial, Our Veterans

Honouring centenarians

Never before have so many Canadians reached the grand old age of 100, and their compatriots are noticing. Among the last of “The Greatest Generation,” many are veterans of the Second World War and Korea, and they have been feted with tributes, news coverage, mailing campaigns, even parades. There’s Fred Arsenault of Toronto (March 6), Harold Freeston of Langley, B.C. (June 24), Armour Hanna of Toronto (July 1), Bill Marr of South Surrey, B.C. (Aug. 25), Winnifred Magor of Calgary (Nov. 9), Robert Spencer of Ottawa (Nov. 9), Gordon Piers of Nicola Valley, B.C. (Nov. 10), David Thiessen of Abbotsford, B.C. (Nov. 11), Jack Coles of Qualicum Beach, B.C. (Nov. 16), Peter Chance of Sidney, B.C. (Nov. 24), Monica Christensen of Toronto (Nov. 26), and George Wilson of Lethbridge, Alta. (Dec....
New partner offers car and home insurance
Editorial

New partner offers car and home insurance

Royal Canadian Legion members and their families can benefit from an exclusive discount on home and car insurance from the Legion’s newest partner in the Member Benefits Package (MBP), belairdirect. These discounts are on top of any other discounts, savings and benefits customers are already eligible for from belairdirect. In addition, members also receive enhanced coverage on residential insurance at no additional cost. Besides saving money, members purchasing insurance from belairdirect will be supporting The Royal Canadian Legion, which in turn supports services and programs for veterans. The program is available now to members residing in British Columbia (home insurance only), Alberta, Ontario and Quebec. To get started, call 1-833-294-2911. For members residing in other regions,...
A new voice for veterans
Editorial

A new voice for veterans

The Legionary debuted on May 15, 1926, establishing a publishing tradition that has tracked the successes and challenges facing Canada’s veterans—and kept readers informed through war and peace and turbulent times.  Early covers featured portraits of military dignitaries. Inside, dense text delivered news of policies and progress on improved support for veterans, commemorative events and stories about military history. In the Roaring Twenties, the magazine reflected readers’ widening interests and lighter mood. Fiction found a place next to history. Covers were more colourful and pages were spiced with humour, including cartoons about a war braggart and the between-wars generation. A sombre look and tone prevailed during the Great Depression. The Christmas editorial in 1930 urged rea...
A different day
Editorial

A different day

Remembrance Day looks different this year, but it is no less meaningful. Pandemic restrictions have had an enormous impact on The Royal Canadian Legion nationwide. Since closing their doors in March, branch social activities—darts, trivia nights, award presentations, wedding receptions—have stopped. By September, however, some tentative and firmly restricted branch reopenings were underway. The halls may have been empty but the Legion’s core work of supporting veterans, their families and communities continued. In many cases, inspiring COVID-19 workarounds were found so as to keep up the good works. Two of the most visible, important and symbolic Legion activities—nationally and locally—are the poppy campaign and Remembrance Day ceremonies. Both are different this time. Just how diffe...
A sacred place
Editorial

A sacred place

It has been 20 years since an unknown soldier who died in the fighting at Vimy Ridge in France during the First World War was reinterred in the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Ottawa. There are previous examples of other countries paying such tribute: Great Britain has the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Westminster Abbey in London; France has one beneath the Arc de Triomphe in Paris; the United States has theirs in Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. Canada’s began as a millennium project proposed by The Royal Canadian Legion. Once the federal government agreed to the plan first suggested in 1996, a massive effort got underway that included the departments of Veterans Affairs, Public Works and Government Services, Canadian Heritage, National Defence, the RCMP, the Canadian War Muse...

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