Our Veterans

Our Veterans

Choose our cover for the next issue of <em>Canada’s Ultimate Story!</em>
News, Our Veterans

Choose our cover for the next issue of Canada’s Ultimate Story!

The next issue of Canada’s Ultimate Story is How Canada conquered VIMY RIDGE. Help choose the cover by casting your vote. It will soon be 105 years since the capture of Vimy Ridge by Canadian soldiers on April 9-12, 1917, and the battle has come to hold a sacred place in our memory of the First World War. Find out how and why the battle was fought and how generations of Canadians have come to understand its meaning—in the latest issue of Canada’s Ultimate Story.   Loading…
Some came home
Our Veterans, Remembrance

Some came home

Fewer than 100 Canadians who died while serving in the world wars were repatriated for burial Until the horrific explosion and fire in HMCS Kootenay which caused nine sailors’ deaths in 1969, Canada’s policy was that all service personnel who died abroad were to be buried overseas. Despite this policy, though, the remains of several Canadian fatalities of the world wars were returned to Canada for burial.    Most Canadian personnel who went overseas during the wars served in Britain at one time or another. Although British officials disapproved of the return of remains from Britain and tried to stop it, Canadian authorities were less inclined to discourage attempts and occasionally bent the rules. Repatriation from elsewhere was strictly forbidden. The Commonwealth War Graves Commissi...
Digital democracy in action
Community, Our Veterans

Digital democracy in action

Delayed by a year, Legion delegates finally met in a virtual convention hall and found strength in unity August 13-15, 883 accredited delegates assembled online for The Royal Canadian Legion’s 48th Dominion Convention and focused on membership, public awareness and efforts to support Canada’s veterans. Delegates entered via a password-protected portal. Due to the pandemic, the in-person convention planned for Saskatoon in August 2020 was rescheduled to August 2021. In April, however, it was decided it would be safest to move it online.  Consultants were hired to design and produce the online convention. Delegates entered via a password-protected portal to find a home page designed to look like a convention hall lobby. Menu items were accessed by clicking on doors: convention ha...
Online monument
Our Veterans, Remembrance

Online monument

The Faces to Graves project is collecting stories and photographs of nearly 6,000 Canadian soldiers buried in Dutch cemeteries For three quarters of a century, people lost in reflection passing through Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery could glean but the barest details of the life and death of Captain Thomas Edward Emmet Clarke. Few facts are inscribed on his headstone. He served with the Canadian Provost Corps and died on April 17, 1945, aged 29. Clarke lived an ordinary life and like so many other ordinary young men who died fighting for their countries throughout the ages, his story ordinarily would have been lost to history. But Clarke’s story, along with those of thousands of other young Canadians who died in the fight to liberate the Netherlands, is to be preserved for gener...
Lytton Branch destroyed by wildfire
News, Our Veterans

Lytton Branch destroyed by wildfire

Lytton, B.C., was devastated by wildfire on June 30.  The hospital, ambulance station and pharmacy were destroyed.The bank, museum, coffee shop, both grocery stores, all gone. And with them, Lytton Branch of The Royal Canadian Legion.  “It’s going to be a challenge,” said Branch President Sheila Maguire in an interview with Legion Magazine  in August. “But we’ll forge on.” It won’t be easy. It won’t be cheap. And it won’t be fast.  The outer walls of the building have collapsed. “We won’t be salvaging anything,” Maguire said. At the end of August she was sorting out insurance issues, too busy to think too far ahead. But she hopes a new building is in the future for the branch, a meeting place for the town’s 250 or so residents and about 2,500 people who live up and down the valley. ...
The Immortal Poppy is digital art
News, Our Veterans

The Immortal Poppy is digital art

The Royal Canadian Legion has digitized a real Flanders poppy to commemorate its 100th year as a symbol of remembrance.  Dubbed the “Immortal Poppy,” the project has created highly detailed virtual copies of a hand-plucked, fully bloomed poppy sourced from Flanders Fields. The petals of the digital flower are 3D and rotatable and bear the names of all Canadian war dead spanning from the First World War.  The poppies will be auctioned off in online marketplaces as limited-edition pieces of digital artwork, with the 100th copy saved for use by the Legion. Each will be presented as a non-fungible token, a type of digital file that is serialized and authenticated on purchase, making each file unique to the buyer. Proceeds of the Immortal Poppy campaign go to the Legion’s poppy fund, used t...

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An informative primer on Canada’s crucial role in the Normandy landing, June 6, 1944.