Our Veterans

Our Veterans

Family mental health support
News

Family mental health support

The Veterans Ombudsperson has urged Veterans Affairs Canada to further reduce restrictions on mental health support for veterans’ families. “We believe that family members of veterans deserve access to funded mental health treatment when their own need is connected to military service, of a family member,” Veterans Ombudsperson Nishika Jardine said while presenting a report on the issue to the Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs (ACVA) on Feb. 17.  Historically, family members were granted access to mental health treatment when it is  directly connected to achieving a positive outcome for the veteran in treatment. If the veteran wasn’t in treatment, the family had no access.  Help for family members is generally limited to 25 sessions a year, meaning families then have to pay for ser...
Panellists condemn sexual misconduct and extremism in military
News

Panellists condemn sexual misconduct and extremism in military

Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan joined a chorus of in-house critics at the Ottawa Conference on Security and Defence in March, calling sexual misconduct allegations plaguing the military “deeply troubling” and promising to create an independent reporting structure for victims.   “Let me be clear,” said Sajjan, “any harassment, discrimination, or sexual misconduct at any rank in any element—military or civilian—is completely unacceptable. “It makes us less-effective allies and partners. It erodes the confidence that people have in our organizations. And, most importantly, it harms those who have chosen to serve our country.” Sajjan’s comments came at the outset of his address to a virtual panel on NATO and United Kingdom/Canada co-operation, part of the three-day annual conference prese...
How to apply for the CAF/DND Sexual Misconduct Class Action Settlement
Serving You

How to apply for the CAF/DND Sexual Misconduct Class Action Settlement

Recently the media has reported on sexual harassment, sexual assault and discrimination on the grounds of sex, gender, gender identity or sexual orientation in the Canadian military. The barriers to reporting such experiences have been acknowledged and include fear of retaliation or consequences to professional development. The Canadian Armed Forces (CAF)–Department of National Defence (DND) Sexual Misconduct Class Action Settlement, approved by the Federal Court on Nov. 25, 2019, will provide financial compensation to current and former members of the CAF, current and former civilian employees, and staff of Non-Public Funds, Canadian Forces. It also provides the option for participation in a restorative engagement program to share personal experiences and effect change in CAF and Veteran...
Panel to report on racism
News

Panel to report on racism

On Dec. 17, the Department of National Defence announced the creation of an advisory panel to report on systemic racism and discrimination in the ranks of the Canadian Armed Forces. The panel has a wide mandate to investigate systemic racism and discrimination and report by the end of the year on how to end systemic discrimination and unconscious bias. The panel is made up of four veterans and is titled the Advisory Panel on Systemic Racism, Discrimination, LGBTQ2 Prejudice, Gender Bias and White Supremacy. It includes one of the first female infantry officers, retired major Sandra Perron, who wrote about abuse and discrimination during her military career; Derek Montour, who left the Canadian military after the Oka Crisis and became a U.S. marine sergeant; retired captain D.L Gibson of ...
Choose our cover for the July/August issue of <em>Legion Magazine</em>!
News

Choose our cover for the July/August issue of Legion Magazine!

Help choose the July/August issue of Legion Magazine! The next issue of Legion Magazine includes a soaring profile of the female pilots who flew air force planes during the Second World War. It also includes the heartbreaking story of Lieutenant William Doane, who was killed in the Battle of the Somme. That and much more! Help choose our cover! Cast your vote, give us your opinion and share with your friends on social media! Loading…
Sombre coverage
Editorial, News

Sombre coverage

The Legionary cover headline in September 1939 was sombre—Canada at War—and the words ‘The Fighting Man’s Magazine’ were added to the masthead.   The magazine’s coverage now included Legion programs for personnel at home and overseas, which included education services, recreation huts, publications, sports and mobile kitchens. The Legionary also had its own overseas correspondent, a Legion welfare officer attached to the 1st Canadian Infantry Division. The July 1940 issue included “The Nazi Bluff,” an essay debunking German invincibility. Improvements and gaps in veterans’ benefits and services continued to be covered, and coverage also reflected concerns of a new generation navigating the bureaucracy to obtain land grants, re-establishment credits, financial aid for higher educa...

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