Our Veterans

Our Veterans

A sacred place
Editorial

A sacred place

It has been 20 years since an unknown soldier who died in the fighting at Vimy Ridge in France during the First World War was reinterred in the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Ottawa. There are previous examples of other countries paying such tribute: Great Britain has the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Westminster Abbey in London; France has one beneath the Arc de Triomphe in Paris; the United States has theirs in Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. Canada’s began as a millennium project proposed by The Royal Canadian Legion. Once the federal government agreed to the plan first suggested in 1996, a massive effort got underway that included the departments of Veterans Affairs, Public Works and Government Services, Canadian Heritage, National Defence, the RCMP, the Canadian War Muse...
Decisions at DEC
News

Decisions at DEC

At its meeting via videoconference on June 6-7, Dominion Executive Council approved several significant motions and considered how COVID-19 will affect The Royal Canadian Legion in the coming months. The impact of the pandemic was a common theme through the meeting: the risk of branches failing and measures to support them; the impact on membership dues and supply sales; and uncertainty over when or whether planned events in the Legion and the wider veteran community would take place. In April, DEC announced it would release up to $3 million from the national reserves to help struggling branches in the wake of the coronavirus. Approximately $1.35 million in Branch Emergency Funds—non-repayable grants—had been dispersed to date. A second tranche and how it would be administered was the fo...
Choose our cover for the next issue of <em>Canada’s Ultimate Story!</em>
News

Choose our cover for the next issue of Canada’s Ultimate Story!

The next issue of Canada’s Ultimate Story is Canada and the Victoria Cross. Help choose the cover by casting your vote. No one ever set out to earn a Victoria Cross, which is awarded for “valour in the face of the enemy.” They were mostly spontaneous acts in the heat of battle. Of 98 Canadian recipients, 36 received their award posthumously. For dozens of action-packed accounts of valour and sacrifice on the battlefield, pick up a copy of Canada and the Victoria Cross, to be released on newsstands in November 2020. CLICK ON THE ABOVE PHOTO TO ENLARGE   Loading…
Métis veterans’ legacy program announced
News

Métis veterans’ legacy program announced

The Métis National Council (MNC) formally announced its Veterans Legacy Program on June 29 in Ottawa. The program is part of the $30-million agreement signed by Canada and the Métis Nation on June 13, 2019, to honour Métis veterans of the Second World War and provide compensation payments. The agreement came with a formal apology from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for the wrongs experienced by Métis veterans when they returned from the war. “Our nation has waited 75 years for this. Canada’s apology to our veterans has resonated throughout the Métis homeland with reverence,” said MNC Veterans Minister David Chartrand. “Those we have lost during our struggle for recognition can finally rest in peace, knowing they have been recognized and honoured for their contributions and sacrifice. Ou...
Victory in the Pacific
Military History, Pictorial, Remembrance

Victory in the Pacific

The defeat of Japan brought horror and joy after years of conflict The war was over. The writing had been on the wall ever since American navy pilots gutted the Japanese fleet at Midway on June 4-7, 1942, six months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, sinking four enemy aircraft carriers and turning the tide of conquest in the Pacific. After a bloody island-hopping campaign that began at Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands in 1942 and worked its way northward, the end came swiftly in a cloud of radioactive dust. The atomic bombs dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 marked the dawn of the nuclear age, a harbinger of the fears—and perhaps a lifesaving lesson—that underscored the Cold War in the decades after. The justification for the nuclear attac...
Military Moments | Canadians in the Battle of Britain
Multi-media Features, News

Military Moments | Canadians in the Battle of Britain

 This year marks the 80th anniversary of the Battle of Britain, which took place from July to October 1940. Our new Military Moment and the next issue of Canada’s Ultimate Story explore the Canadians who took part in the furious air defence of Britain against the German Luftwaffe. As Winston Churchill later proclaimed "Never, in the field of human conflict, was so much owed by so many to so few." Narrated by Canvet Publications’ Stephen J. Thorne, this Military Moment takes us back to July 10, 1940, when the Luftwaffe struck hard at Great Britain, attempting to soften the country for a land invasion. The Battle of Britain started with Luftwaffe raids on shipping in the English Channel, then on airfields and radar bases. In early September, the attacks shifted again, to London, Coven...
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