Our Veterans

Our Veterans

Young artists showcase the will to remember
News, Our Veterans

Young artists showcase the will to remember

Emily-Ann Alyward had three great-grandfathers and a great-grandmother who served during the Second World War, but they were not the inspiration for the work that earned her first place in the 2021 senior black and white poster contest.  Her inspiration instead came from her circle of friends and three British Columbia communities—Ladysmith, where she lives, Duncan, where she graduated from Duncan Christian School, and Nanaimo, where she intends to study graphic design at Vancouver Island University.  “Multiple cultures and people served, and their stories deserve to be told.” The southeastern coast of Vancouver Island is home to more than a dozen First Nations and is steeped in Indigenous history; yet not much is known in wider society about Indigenous peoples’ wartime contribu...
Pick up the pace
Editorial, Our Veterans

Pick up the pace

The backlog of benefit applications at Veterans Affairs Canada is beyond exasperating. Despite good intentions, despite throwing more money and additional people at the problem, the backlog persists, and is even poised to grow as the pandemic winds down, if predictions of veterans’ advocates prove correct.   Veterans Affairs Canada set its service standard at providing decisions on 80 per cent of applications within 16 weeks of accepting them, a target it met for fewer than one in four applications in 2019-2020. This was down from 37 per cent the year before.  The reason for the backlog is simple. The department is flooded with applications. New benefits have come on stream, eligibility for other benefits has been widened, and veterans and serving members of the Canadian Armed For...
The man who skipped a line
Memoirs, Our Veterans

The man who skipped a line

He signed in the wrong place, but representing Canada at Japan’s surrender was still a career highlight for soldier-diplomat Lawrence Cosgrave Laughter rippled over the waves of Pearl Harbor. It was a breezy, cloudless, perfect Hawaiian day not so very long ago.    Tourists, clad in all sorts of loud and tasteless vacation getups, clustered around a display case on the canvas-topped surrender deck of the battleship and Second World War icon USS Missouri. Now a museum, the 45,000-tonne decommissioned warship in Pearl Harbor is a pantheon for naval history buffs and even the slightly bored sightseers who overrun Oahu. “I am not supposed to say this, but the Canadians signed on the wrong line,” the museum guide said from behind dark, oversized sunglasses. He aimed a laser pointer—the k...
Choose our cover for the next issue of <em>Canada’s Ultimate Story!</em>
News, Our Veterans

Choose our cover for the next issue of Canada’s Ultimate Story!

Help choose the cover for our next issue of Canada’s Ultimate Story! Since the first people arrived on this continent, the place that would be called Canada has been shaped by conflict and co-operation. The impacts of war and the bounties of friendship echo through the story of Canada. To find out how Canada became the nation it is today, pick up a copy of “O Canada: War and Peace” on newsstands starting Nov. 1. Loading…
Choose our cover for the November/December issue of <em>Legion Magazine</em>!
News, Our Veterans

Choose our cover for the November/December issue of Legion Magazine!

Help choose the November/December cover of Legion Magazine! The next issue of Legion Magazine includes a poignant look at how the poppy became a symbol of remembrance. It also includes the heartbreaking story of the Battle of Hong Kong, the first battle of WW II for Canadian soldiers. That and much more! Help choose our cover! Cast your vote, give us your opinion, and share with your friends on social media! Loading…
RCMP needs “fundamental transformation” to end systemic racism, says report
News, Our Veterans

RCMP needs “fundamental transformation” to end systemic racism, says report

Fundamental transformation of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police is necessary to end systemic racism, concludes a landmark report by the Commons public safety committee.   It recommends the RCMP transition away from a paramilitary force into a police service with stronger civilian oversight, that the federal government support provinces and territories that want to develop their own police services and investigate ending contracts for RCMP policing. “This, in my judgment, is a time for Canada to have a reckoning with itself and with its premier institutions,” committee chair John McKay said at a news conference after release of the 100-page report.  The report, Systemic Racism in Policing in Canada, released in June, makes 42 wide-ranging recommendations for police reform, 23 of which fo...

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