Docbots and drones

Military medics used to paint their helmets or wear armbands with red crosses to make themselves more visible, signalling to the enemy that they, and the soldiers they cared for, were not combatants. In a once widely respected humanitarian rule of war, they were not deliberately targeted. But they can no longer count on...
  • Using nano technology to heal wounds

    November 17, 2017 by Sharon Adams
    For more than 150 years, troops have known the abbreviation TNT has stood for an explosive that can wound and kill. In the future, they may instead recognize it as something that can heal wounds, save limbs and regenerate injured brains. Researchers at Ohio State...
  • Survey shows improved satisfaction with VAC

    November 10, 2017 by Sharon Adams
    Veterans seem to be happier with most aspects of service from Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC), but the department’s 2017 national client survey shows continuing dissatisfaction with some services and benefits.  VAC surveyed 1,508 veterans in proportionally representative samples of each group of its 177,149 clients,...
  • Survey shows improved satisfaction with VAC

    November 6, 2017 by Sharon Adams
    Veterans seem to be happier with most aspects of service from Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC), but the department’s 2017 national client survey shows continuing dissatisfaction with some services and benefits.  VAC surveyed 1,508 veterans in proportionally representative samples of each group of its 177,149 clients,...
  • The prince with a common touch

    October 16, 2017 by Stephen J. Thorne
    Mike Trauner was a prisoner in his own home until a few inspiring words from Prince Henry of Wales, better known as Harry, set him free. As a master corporal with 3rd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment, Trauner lost both legs and sustained other major wounds...
  • Invictus Games will evolve, patron says

    October 11, 2017 by Stephen J. Thorne
    When it comes to the future of the now-annual event that he created, Prince Harry is an optimist—meaning he doesn’t believe there will be a perpetual need for the Invictus Games as we now know them. Ideally, he suggests, the competition for sick and wounded...
  • Researcher finds much to study in Invictus Games

    October 4, 2017 by Stephen J. Thorne
    Preliminary findings of a three-part Dalhousie University study into the physical and psychological benefits of sport to wounded veterans and their families have told athletes what most already know: sport is good. Nevertheless, the most important element of Celina Shirazipour’s work may come down the...
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