Military Health Matters

Stories and features pertaining to Veterans Health Issues.

Using nano technology to heal wounds
Military Health Matters

Using nano technology to heal wounds

For more than 150 years, troops have known the abbreviation TNT has stood for an explosive that can wound and kill. In the future, they may instead recognize it as something that can heal wounds, save limbs and regenerate injured brains. Researchers at Ohio State University are ready to begin human trials of a new technology that is a potential game changer in treatment of wounds, injuries and a myriad of other health conditions. That’s if TNT—tissue nano transfection—works as well in humans as it does in mice and pigs. “By using our novel nanochip technology, injured or compromised organs can be replaced,” Chandan Sen, director of Ohio State’s Center for Regenerative Medicine and Cell Based Therapies said in a prepared statement. “We have shown that skin is a fertile land where we can...
Nutrition in the field
Military Health Matters

Nutrition in the field

An army, it has been noted, marches on its stomach. Throughout history, invaders and marauders have relied on scavenging and pillaging to feed troops at the far end of very long supply lines. In 1810, Napoleon said his Grand Armée troops “must feed themselves on war at the expense of the enemy territory.” French brewer and confectioner Nicolas Appert won a hefty prize from his government in 1810 for his method of preventing spoilage by cooking food sealed inside glass jars—popularly known as canning, after the commercial introduction of cheaper, unbreakable tin containers. But the method was not perfected by the time Napoleon decided to invade Russia, where in 1812 his scavenging strategy failed against the scorched-earth defence. Retreating Russian forces burned villages and crops...
Cure or curse?
Health, Military Health Matters

Cure or curse?

Canadian Airborne Regiment veteran Dave Bona woke up with the same question every morning for more than 20 years: “Is today the day I’m going to kill myself?” He joined the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) in 1984, served in Cyprus in 1988-89 and the First Gulf War in 1990-91. But he was never the same after missions to Somalia in 1992 and Rwanda in 1993-94. He had vivid nightmares, flashbacks of horrible deaths of children, hair-trigger rage, vertigo and nausea, seizures, diarrhea, insomnia so bad he could only get to sleep after staying up for days and drinking himself insensible. Symptoms—and the drinking—persisted after he returned to Canada, resulting in a court martial in 2000 and discharge from the service and loss of his marriage. He was eventually diagnosed with post-traumatic...

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