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The law reaches Fort Whoop-Up

  In 1873, the people of what is now southern Alberta and Saskatchewan had a serious complaint. With no police force, traders and outlaws who had fled prohibition in the United States had established a well-defended fort where they traded buffalo robes and sold U.S. whiskey, largely to First Nations people, and spread criminal...
  • Billy Bishop’s early morning raid

    May 29, 2019 by Sharon Adams
    In the first two months of Billy Bishop’s flying career, from the end of March to the end of May 1917, the flying ace had brought down 22 planes and earned the Distinguished Service Order and the Military Cross. And his most famous exploit was...
  • Peace at last

    May 28, 2019 by Sharon Adams
    We sat down with Gary Luton, Director of Treaty Law at Global Affairs Canada to discuss the most famous treaty of the 20th Century, the Treaty of Versailles. The signing of the Armistice at 5:45 a.m. on Nov. 11, 1918, ended the fighting between the...
  • Eisenhower & Rommel

    May 25, 2019 by Mark Zuehlke
    DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER In the end, everything depended on the weather. On the evening of June 3, 1944—with 150,000 men, nearly 12,000 aircraft and almost 7,000 sea vessels awaiting his command—Supreme Allied Commander General Dwight D. Eisenhower had to measure the reliability of his chief...
  • Queen Victoria and the growth of Canada

    May 23, 2019 by Sharon Adams
    May 24 marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of Queen Victoria, during whose 63-year reign Canada moved from colony to confederation—mostly peacefully, thanks in large part to her. Perhaps she was predisposed to fondness for the colony, as her father, Edward, Duke of Kent...
  • Was D-Day perfectly timed?

    May 17, 2019 by Legion Magazine
      On the eve of the Normandy landings on June 6, 1944, General Dwight D. Eisenhower, the Supreme Allied Commander, prepared two statements about Operation Overlord, the assault on Fortress Europe. Despite the horrendous weather, Eisenhower gave the go-ahead, delaying the landings for one day....
  • Attacks in the Saint Lawrence

    May 15, 2019 by Sharon Adams
    The Second World War came home to Canada with a U-boat attack in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence in the spring of 1942, bringing the naval conflict to Canada’s inland waters. Between 1942 and 1944, 23 ships were sunk by German submarines and hundreds of...