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Capture of 22-metre transatlantic narco-sub marks new era in war on drugs

  Spanish authorities recently captured a 22-metre submarine after its three crewmen transported US$121-million worth of cocaine 7,700 kilometres across the Atlantic Ocean from Colombia, then scuttled it and ran. It’s the biggest narcotics submarine ever found, and the first confirmed to have transported drugs from the Americas to Europe, signalling what experts have characterized as...
  • A German commander’s assessment of the D-Day invasion

    July 17, 2019 by Stephen J. Thorne
    A field report submitted by Adolf Hitler’s commander-in-chief on the western front said the Allies’ invading D-Day forces gained a foothold in occupied Europe due to four key factors. In the report filed two weeks after the June 6, 1944, invasion, Field Marshal Karl R....
  • First Blood

    July 10, 2019 by Stephen J. Thorne
    Wednesday, March 13, 2002, broke sunny and cool as 500 Canadian soldiers assembled on the tarmac in the yellow morning light at the U.S. military base in Bagram, Afghanistan. Wearing their new green camouflage fatigues on combat operations for the first time, they sat and...
  • Last men standing

    July 3, 2019 by Stephen J. Thorne
    More than a million Canadians served in the Second World War. As of March 31, 2018, just 41,100 of them remained, according to Veterans Affairs Canada. They averaged 93 years old. Some 25,000 Canadians served in Korea. Sixteen months ago, 7,200 survived, average age 86....
  • Ted Martens: Dutch resistance fighter

    June 26, 2019 by Stephen J. Thorne
    Ted Martens did whatever he could to derail the Nazi war machine while serving with the Dutch resistance during the Second World War—then the Nazi war machine derailed him, but only briefly. Martens was captured early in 1942 and came within a hair’s-breadth of torture...
  • For decades, politicians referred to the Korean War as the ‘Korean Conflict,’ as if the soldiers who fought and died on the battlefields of the disputed peninsula were somehow less soldierly or less dead if killed by conflict rather than war. Some 2.5 million people...
  • George Alfred Newburn: A soldier of the First World War

    June 12, 2019 by Stephen J. Thorne
    His name was George Alfred Newburn, a labourer from Victoria who was killed during the Battle of Hill 70 in France on Aug. 15, 1917. He was just 18 years old, although Newburn would have you believe he was 20. For almost a century, Private...
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