Eight Cantleys and one Cantlie in the First World War

Of 619,636 Canadians recruited during the First World War, there were 7,432 Smiths and 148 Smyths, 2,965 McDonalds and 1,646 MacDonalds, 2,342 Johnsons and 1,532 Johnstons. There were 1,797 Stewarts and 294 Stuarts, 1,220 McLeans and 310 MacLeans. There were just eight Cantleys and one Cantlie. According to their service records posted online by...
  • Spitfire documentary soars with nostalgia

    August 15, 2018 by Stephen J. Thorne
    For its aerial cinematography alone, airplane geeks and war history buffs alike will love the new documentary Spitfire: The Plane That Saved the World. Under the image direction of renowned aviation photographer John Dibbs, the aerial footage—set against dramatic cloudscapes, the pastoral English countryside, the...
  • European Union
    re-evaluates defence capabilities

    August 8, 2018 by Stephen J. Thorne
    Canada has reaffirmed its support for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) while the European Union weighs its limited options after United States President Donald Trump launched double-barreled criticisms of both the 69-year-old military alliance and the EU. In a recent column for the National...
  • Winston wets his whistle: Churchill’s indulgences

    August 1, 2018 by Stephen J. Thorne
    In December 1941, just days after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, United States president Franklin Delano Roosevelt informed his wife Eleanor that a guest, or guests, would be coming to stay at the White House. “He told me I could not know who was coming,...
  • It’s telling that the finalists for the most prestigious prize in photojournalism were all connected to some form of conflict, yet the principal subjects in all six photographs were civilians. For the first time in its 61-year history, the esteemed World Press Photo (WPP) competition...
  • Canadian kids learn of RAF’s rich history

    July 18, 2018 by Stephen J. Thorne
    The Jack Tars of the Royal Navy may have ruled the seven seas in the 19th century, but Royal Air Force pilots owned the skies over Britain in the 20th. Indeed, Britain’s “finest hour,” as Prime Minister Winston Churchill called it, came mainly thanks to...
  • Reinhard Hardegen: Last of the U-boat aces

    July 11, 2018 by Stephen J. Thorne
    He ranked No. 24 on the list of Germany’s Second World War U-boat aces but, in sheer chutzpah, few could compare with Reinhard Hardegen. Hardegen died in Germany on June 9 at age 105, the last of a breed both reviled and respected for preying...
  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. 5
  7. 6
  8. 7
  9. 8
  10. 9
  11. ...
  12. 26