More angel than mortal: The nursing sisters of The Great War

They provided medical aid, comfort and peace to wounded and dying soldiers throughout decades of conflict, but it was during the First World War that the nursing sisters of the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps came into their own. Nicknamed “Bluebirds” for their blue dresses and white veils, many soldiers considered the 3,141 nursing...
  • Climb aboard a water-borne improvised explosive device

    March 28, 2018 by Stephen J. Thorne
    Rebels in Yemen are wielding a new naval weapon on the Red Sea, but it took some time after it was first used for authorities to realize what they were dealing with. An explosives-laden boat belonging to Yemen’s Ansar Allah, or Houthi, forces collided with...
  • Belgian king returns field gun to Canada

    March 21, 2018 by Stephen J. Thorne
    It’s been nearly a century since Canadian guns fell silent at Mons, Belgium, the last city they liberated before Germany surrendered and the war to end all wars was ended. Canadian 18-pound field guns, ubiquitous among Allied forces between 1914 and 1918, are said to...
  • The story of a forgotten airplane

    March 14, 2018 by Stephen J. Thorne
    In early March, the co-founder of Microsoft, Paul Allen, led an expedition 800 kilometres east of Australia, where he found the long-lost wreck of the USS Lexington, an aircraft carrier sunk during the Battle of the Coral Sea almost 76 years ago. Among the stunning...
  • The changing face of recruiting

    March 7, 2018 by Stephen J. Thorne
    Canadian demographics are changing and military recruiters will have to change with them if they want to keep up, says Darrell Bricker. “We have this perception of who this country is that is no longer true,” the chief executive officer of Ipsos Public Relations told...
  • Statues in changing times

    February 28, 2018 by Stephen J. Thorne
    History is written by the victors—a quote that has widely been attributed to Winston Churchill, and also to Napoleon Bonaparte, Mark Twain, Niccolo Machiavelli and Walter Benjamin, a German Jewish philosopher who committed suicide in 1940 rather than be caught by the Nazis. But victors...
  • The dream of space thrives

    February 21, 2018 by Stephen J. Thorne
    When I was young, the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo launches out of Cape Canaveral were family television events without parallel. There was a sense of awe surrounding those NASA missions, culminating years later in the triumphant moon landings. We followed every one, minute-by-transfixed-minute, on a...
  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. 5
  7. 6
  8. 7
  9. ...
  10. 18