Betty Metcalfe: “I lost my brother to a Nazi executioner”

The last words Betty Metcalfe’s brother Jack ever spoke to her still haunt her almost 80 years later. It was 1940 and the Metcalfe family of Glace Bay, N.S.—mother, father, their two girls and two boys—had just spent their last Christmas together. Betty and her younger sister Yvonne would join the Women’s Army Corps....
  • A letter of marque from the king

    August 7, 2019 by Stephen J. Thorne
    It may have been the best investment Enos Collins, Benjamin Knaut and John and James Barss ever made. The merchants of Liverpool, N.S., purchased Severn, a former American slave ship captured by the Royal Navy, in 1811 for a mere 420 British pounds (about C$53,000...
  • The Central American country of Honduras is gripped by corruption, violence and political instability. With 91.4 homicides per 100,000 people, it has the highest murder rate in the world and extreme levels of sexual abuse. It is no place for children. No wonder, then, that...
  • Sergeant Jeremy Blair was on his third Afghanistan tour, serving with Charles Company, 5 Platoon, 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment, when his unit got hit hard during a coalition offensive in the Panjwaii District southwest of Kandahar. It was September 2006 and Operation Medusa had...
  • A German commander’s assessment of the D-Day invasion

    July 17, 2019 by Stephen J. Thorne
    A field report submitted by Adolf Hitler’s commander-in-chief on the western front said the Allies’ invading D-Day forces gained a foothold in occupied Europe due to four key factors. In the report filed two weeks after the June 6, 1944, invasion, Field Marshal Karl R....
  • First Blood

    July 10, 2019 by Stephen J. Thorne
    Wednesday, March 13, 2002, broke sunny and cool as 500 Canadian soldiers assembled on the tarmac in the yellow morning light at the U.S. military base in Bagram, Afghanistan. Wearing their new green camouflage fatigues on combat operations for the first time, they sat and...
  • Last men standing

    July 3, 2019 by Stephen J. Thorne
    More than a million Canadians served in the Second World War. As of March 31, 2018, just 41,100 of them remained, according to Veterans Affairs Canada. They averaged 93 years old. Some 25,000 Canadians served in Korea. Sixteen months ago, 7,200 survived, average age 86....
  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. 5
  7. 6
  8. 7
  9. ...
  10. 29
How well do you know Canada?

The Great Canada Quiz

Test your knowledge and win cash prizes up to $1,000!
GET STARTED!
close-link