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Eye On Defence

The Arctic threat

A conflict brews in the Far North Given Russia’s flagrant violation of Ukraine’s sovereignty and its use of force in a conflict that few countries

Military monies

Canada’s 2022 federal budget promised $8billion more for defence- but is it enough? The Russian invasion of Ukraine that began on February 24 will alter

Defence dilemma

Why Canada should respond to global threats  Primordial violence, hatred and enmity. Carl von Clausewitz called these necessities for war the “paradoxical trinity” in his

Down to two

On Dec. 1, 2021, the federal government dropped the Boeing Super Hornet from the competition to replace the aging McDonnell Douglas CF-18 Hornet fighters with

Are we disarming?

Last fall, the Royal Navy offered to help Canada guard our strategic interests in the Arctic. The offer was not noticed much by Canadian newspapers

Lessons to learn

The fall of Afghanistan prompts a tough question: “Was it worth it?”   The Afghanistan government of Ashraf Ghani collapsed in mid-August and the Taliban,

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Cannons and Cutlasses: The Great Lakes Battles

During the War of 1812, the inland seas of North America—the Great Lakes—were the setting for major maritime operations. Both Britain and the United States devoted tremendous energy and resources to creating naval forces on the lakes as water provided the best means of transporting and supplying land forces. Naval bases sprung up almost overnight and ship construction was maintained at a dizzying pace. At the outbreak of war, the U.S. had exactly one warship on the Great Lakes, a 16-gun vessel on Lake Ontario. By 1814, it had 28 major warships, the largest mounting 58 guns. The Royal Navy expanded in a similar proportion. In 1814 the U.S. Navy constructed and commissioned a warship on Lake Champlain in the amazing time of 33 days, while Britain built a battleship, HMS St. Lawrence, on Lake Ontario that was larger than HMS Victory, Nelson’s flagship at Trafalgar.

Medical care in the wars of the future

The challenges of battlefield medicine are about to change for Western allied nations, now that the focus of threats has migrated to China, Russia, Iran and North

The lost nuke of British Columbia

In September 1949, U.S. President Harry Truman announced the Soviet Union had detonated an atomic device. Early in the following year, U.S. air crews were

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