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The winged ship: HMCS Bras d’Or

Legion Magazine sat down with Lt. (N) Jason Delaney, Naval Historian at the Directorate of History and Heritage for the Department of National Defence, to discuss Canada’s hydrofoil project of the 1960s – HMCS Bras d’Or. During sea trials in 1969, the vessel exceeded 63 knots (117 km/h; 72 mph), making her the fastest...
  • Synchronize watches

    November 4, 2019 by Steve Mertl
    As Zero Hour approached on the morning of April 9, 1917, and waves of soldiers prepared to assault Vimy Ridge, almost a thousand British and Canadian guns began a complex creeping barrage to protect the advancing infantry. “They’re supposed to be somewhere between 60 and...
  • Is war inevitable?

    November 1, 2019 by Legion Magazine
    The word ‘inevitable’ sets me off. It suggests that wars simply happen. Wars become abstractions, beyond human control, explanation and history. That is nonsense. A century on, the notion that the First World War was inevitable still lingers. Many children (including my own) pass their...
  • On this date: November 2019

    November 1, 2019 by Legion Magazine
    1 November 1914 In a battle off the coast of Chile, four midshipmen are the first Canadian naval casualties of the First World War, perishing with the crew of HMS Good Hope. 4 November 1914 Nurse Margaret Macdonald is appointed matron-in-chief of the Canadian Army...
  • Spain and Britain settle a trade war

    October 30, 2019 by Sharon Adams
    Spain and Great Britain once nearly went to war over what is now a part of Canada. The Spanish were the first Europeans to explore and claim the Pacific Northwest. In 1493, Pope Alexander VI granted Spain a claim to any lands they discovered west...
  • RCAF’s first Distinguished Flying Cross

    October 24, 2019 by Sharon Adams
    On Oct. 22, 1940, Squadron Leader Ernest McNab of Saskatoon was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, the first member of the Royal Canadian Air Force to be decorated (excluding those Canadians serving with the Royal Air Force). Commanding officer of Canada’s first fighter squadron, McNab...
  • Opening the Estuary

    October 17, 2019 by Mark Zuehlke
    Britain’s XXX Corps closed in on Antwerp on Aug. 30, 1944, General Bernard Montgomery decided it was unnecessary to open the Belgian city’s massive port to Allied shipping. So, despite the liberation of the city on Sept. 2, no advance north of the Albert Canal...
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