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The death of a poet and fighter pilot

On Dec. 11, 1941, a 19-year-old pilot died in England. He had been in service only 10 weeks, had seen combat only once, and as far as anyone knows, inflicted no damage on the enemy. But he will never be forgotten as long as there are pilots who want to slip the surly bonds...
  • Is war inevitable?

    November 1, 2019 by Legion Magazine
    The word ‘inevitable’ sets me off. It suggests that wars simply happen. Wars become abstractions, beyond human control, explanation and history. That is nonsense. A century on, the notion that the First World War was inevitable still lingers. Many children (including my own) pass their...
  • On this date: November 2019

    November 1, 2019 by Legion Magazine
    1 November 1914 In a battle off the coast of Chile, four midshipmen are the first Canadian naval casualties of the First World War, perishing with the crew of HMS Good Hope. 4 November 1914 Nurse Margaret Macdonald is appointed matron-in-chief of the Canadian Army...
  • Spain and Britain settle a trade war

    October 30, 2019 by Sharon Adams
    Spain and Great Britain once nearly went to war over what is now a part of Canada. The Spanish were the first Europeans to explore and claim the Pacific Northwest. In 1493, Pope Alexander VI granted Spain a claim to any lands they discovered west...
  • RCAF’s first Distinguished Flying Cross

    October 24, 2019 by Sharon Adams
    On Oct. 22, 1940, Squadron Leader Ernest McNab of Saskatoon was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, the first member of the Royal Canadian Air Force to be decorated (excluding those Canadians serving with the Royal Air Force). Commanding officer of Canada’s first fighter squadron, McNab...
  • Opening the Estuary

    October 17, 2019 by Mark Zuehlke
    Britain’s XXX Corps closed in on Antwerp on Aug. 30, 1944, General Bernard Montgomery decided it was unnecessary to open the Belgian city’s massive port to Allied shipping. So, despite the liberation of the city on Sept. 2, no advance north of the Albert Canal...
  • A war of bread and potatoes

    October 16, 2019 by Sharon Adams
    When fighting drew near to the small village of Montigny-en-Ostrevent, France, near the end of the First World War, civilians wisely evacuated. When they returned home, many found their houses and cottages occupied by Canadian liberators—squatters who were nonetheless warmly welcomed. “We struck a fine...
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