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The death of a poet and fighter pilot

On Dec. 11, 1941, a 19-year-old pilot died in England. He had been in service only 10 weeks, had seen combat only once, and as far as anyone knows, inflicted no damage on the enemy. But he will never be forgotten as long as there are pilots who want to slip the surly bonds...
  • The sinking of U-536

    November 20, 2019 by Sharon Adams
    In an irony of war, a German U-boat meant to harry the eastern coast of Canada came to its bitter end in the mid-Atlantic, its surviving crew rescued by Canadian sailors. U-536 was commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf Shauenburg, who had joined the navy in 1934,...
  • Montreal is captured by the Americans

    November 14, 2019 by Sharon Adams
    On Nov. 13, 1775, Montreal was captured, without a fight, by American revolutionaries. The American Revolution, the revolt by American Patriots in the British colonies on the Eastern Seaboard which began in April 1775, naturally boiled over from the Thirteen Colonies to British colonies in...
  • Last soldier standing

    November 10, 2019 by Stephen J. Thorne
    More than a million Canadians served in the Second World War. Just 41,100 of them remained as of March 31, 2018, according to Veterans Affairs Canada. They averaged 93 years old. Some 25,000 Canadians served in Korea. As of the same date, 7,200 remained, and...
  • Indigenous War Heroes

    November 8, 2019 by Sharon Adams
    Their ancestors fought beside the British in the Seven Years War and the American Revolution in the 1700s and in the War of 1812. In 1885, they navigated Africa’s Nile River on a British military rescue mission and volunteered for Canada’s first international expeditionary force...
  • George Pearkes and the Battle of Passchendaele

    November 7, 2019 by Sharon Adams
    In 1917, the British wanted to destroy U-boat bases on the Belgian coast before the Germans could mount a blockade that would cripple Allied efforts. Capturing the ridge at Passchendaele, the highest point in the area, would give them an advantage. The Canadian Corps, which...
  • Synchronize watches

    November 4, 2019 by Steve Mertl
    As Zero Hour approached on the morning of April 9, 1917, and waves of soldiers prepared to assault Vimy Ridge, almost a thousand British and Canadian guns began a complex creeping barrage to protect the advancing infantry. “They’re supposed to be somewhere between 60 and...
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