Military History

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Forming the Canadian Airborne Regiment

With the formation of the Canadian Airborne Regiment on April 8, 1968, the Chief of the Defence Staff General Jean Victor Allard achieved his dream of a flexible immediate response force. He intended it to be quite different. “This regiment would not reflect the identity of a Victorian-era regiment because its members would serve...
  • Niobe’s Brief Operational Career: Navy, Part 5

    September 1, 2004 by Marc Milner
    PHOTO: NOTMAN STUDIO, national Archives of canada—PA028497 Niobe sits in dry dock prior to her service in World War I. Part 5 As war clouds gathered over Europe in July 1914, the Royal Canadian Navy’s only East Coast ship—HMCS Niobe—lay mouldering alongside the dockyard in...
  • Trench Warfare In 1915: Army, Part 54

    September 1, 2004 by Terry Copp
    PHOTO: HORACE BROWN, NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF CANADA—PA107276 Canadian troops share a smoke in the trenches in France in 1915. The last elements of 1st Canadian Infantry Division left the Ypres salient on May 4, 1915, having suffered just over 6,000 casualties. One Canadian battalion, the...
  • Dorothy Stevens

    September 1, 2004 by Jennifer Morse
    CANADIAN WAR MUSEUM—AN19710261-0955 Munitions—Fuse Factory. The early decades of the 20th century were a time of momentous change for women in Canada. During World War I, women were not recruited as official war artists. Instead, female artists were limited to commissions on subjects deemed appropriate...
  • Valour On The Somme: Part 5 of 18

    September 1, 2004 by Arthur Bishop
    ILLUSTRATIONS: SHARIF TARABAY Clockwise from top left: Victoria Cross recipients Thomas Wilkinson, Lionel Clarke, James Richardson and John Kerr. Das Blutbad the blood bath. The consummate German designation for those murderous battles of the Somme. During the last six months of 1916, over that part...
  • A High Flyer, Indeed: Air Force, Part 4

    July 1, 2004 by Hugh A. Halliday
    PHOTO: NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF CANADA–RE20365 A signed photograph of Ernest Lloyd Janney, taken in Toronto in 1915. The Canadian government’s pre-World War I military aviation policy was simple—there was none. Aircraft trials at Petawawa, Ont., in 1909 had ended in two crashes, and efforts by...
  • The Horrors Of Gas Warfare: Army, Part 53

    July 1, 2004 by Terry Copp
    Photo: national archives of canada Richard Jack’s painting, The Second Battle of Ypres, depicts the battle scene in 1915. While 1st Canadian Infantry Division was training and re-equipping in England, the war on the Western Front had become stalemated. Trenches began to stretch from the...