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How to beat the bomber

Ten years ago on Feb. 19, an improvised explosive device was found under a major road in Afghanistan. The device was placed about 10 metres down a small culvert—out of reach of equipment, impossible to shield. A robot couldn’t finish the job. There was nothing for it but to send in someone—a volunteer—to defuse...
  • Slaughter At St-Éloi: Army, Part 55

    November 1, 2004 by Terry Copp
    PHOTO: NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF CANADA, Walter B. Riddiford–PA145659 Canadian soldiers enjoy coffee on the Western Front in 1916. When the government of Kaiser Wilhelm’s Germany decided to change the balance of power in Europe by military action, it did so in the firm belief that...
  • Preparing For The Past: Air Force, Part 6

    November 1, 2004 by Hugh A. Halliday
    PHOTO: NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF CANADA The Armstrong-Whitworth Atlas, used for army co-operation flying, joined the RCAF in the late 1920s. Army cooperation flying had been the central role of aircraft during World War I (Eyes In The Skies, March/April). In the interwar years, the Royal...
  • Paraskeva Clark

    November 1, 2004 by Jennifer Morse
    CANADIAN WAR MUSEUM–AN19710261-0685 ‘Quaicker Girls’. Paraskeva Clark’s paintings depict activities of the Royal Canadian AirForce Women’s Division. Paraskeva Clark believed the art of a nation is not made by a few elite artists of the time, but by the many who give us variety in...
  • Vimy And More: Part 6 of 18

    November 1, 2004 by Arthur Bishop
    ILLUSTRATIONS: Sharif Tarabay Clockwise from top left: Victoria Cross recipients Frederick Maurice Watson Harvey, Robert Grierson Combe, Ellis Wellwood Sifton, John George Pattison, William Johnstone Milne and Thain Wendell MacDowell. The Battle of Vimy Ridge, which historian George Nasmith called “probably the most brilliant success...
  • The Imperial Gift: Air Force, Part 5

    September 1, 2004 by Hugh A. Halliday
    PHOTO: NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF CANADA—PA53249 The engine is changed in a Felixstowe F.3 flying boat at Victoria Beach, Man., in August 1922. In 1919-20, the British government presented hundreds of airplanes and associated equipment to several of its dominions. In Canada and Australia, these assets...
  • Niobe’s Brief Operational Career: Navy, Part 5

    September 1, 2004 by Marc Milner
    PHOTO: NOTMAN STUDIO, national Archives of canada—PA028497 Niobe sits in dry dock prior to her service in World War I. Part 5 As war clouds gathered over Europe in July 1914, the Royal Canadian Navy’s only East Coast ship—HMCS Niobe—lay mouldering alongside the dockyard in...
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