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Provisional government declared in Saskatchewan

In the 1880s, the Canadian Prairies were a political powder keg. Bison herds were gone, land had been signed away in treaties and indigenous peoples were starving. The Métis wanted title to their homesteads and farms, whose boundaries were ignored by government and railway surveyors. After poor harvests in 1883 and 1884, farmers were...
  • C. Anthony Law

    November 1, 1997 by Jennifer Morse
    Bold strokes and hot colour characterize the work of C. Anthony Law. From top to bottom: Survivors, Normandy, Off Le Havre; Windy Day In The British Assault Area; Decommissioning, Rainy Weather, Sydney, N.S. C. Anthony Law, who died late last year, was born in England...
  • The Battle For Ortona: Army, Part 18

    November 1, 1997 by Terry Copp
    The actual terrain over which a battle is fought may be the most important primary source of information available to the historian, but ground must be related to weather. Canadians who visit Italy’s Adriatic coast are unlikely to arrive in the grey of winter, when...
  • Looking Beyond The Casualties: Army, Part 17

    September 1, 1997 by Terry Copp
    The University of Edinburgh in Scotland has recently established a centre for WW II studies that could serve as a model for Canadian universities. Its mandate is “to promote knowledge and understanding of all aspects” of WW II and to “stimulate research into major themes...
  • The news of General Andrew McNaughton’s retirement was announced on Dec. 26, 1943. McNaughton’s brief statement offered no explanation for the decision and the men and women of what was sometimes called “Andy’s army” were surprised and confused. The following week, as McNaughton and his...
  • Campbell Tinning

    March 1, 1997 by Jennifer Morse
    Campbell Tinning’s watercolor work includes from top to bottom: In The Vault Of The Cemetery; an illustrated letter to his mother and father; Drifting Down. Although Canadian war artist Campbell Tinning witnessed the horrors of WW II, he managed to maintain a quiet sense of...
  • Kenneth Forbes

    March 1, 1997 by Jennifer Morse
    Kenneth Forbes was able to depict the reality of WW I. His work includes from top to bottom: Portrait of Cpl. William Metcalf, VC. Metcalf earned the award on Sept. 2, 1918, during the Second Battle of Arras; Canadian Artillery in Action. You only have...