Military History

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The sinking of
HMCS Esquimalt

HMCS Esquimalt, the last Canadian warship lost to enemy action in the Second World War, went down within sight of Halifax. Although 43 of the 71 crew survived the sinking, 16 died after spending six hours in the frigid waters. That spring, the days of cocky submarine wolf pack attacks were long past. Germany...
  • Robert Buckham

    January 1, 1999 by Jennifer Morse
    Art was Robert Buckham’s life—or at least his sanity. It got him through the hell of two forced marches during his time as a PoW in Germany during WW II. From top to bottom: On The March, April 1945; RAF Polish Officer. Born in Toronto...
  • TAF Over Normandy: Army, Part 24

    January 1, 1999 by Terry Copp
    The 75th anniversary year for the Royal Canadian Air Force is also the 55th anniversary year for the Battle of Normandy. Without a doubt, the story of the RCAF’s part in the struggle to liberate France has captured the imaginations of air historians. However, few...
  • Florence Wyle

    November 1, 1998 by Jennifer Morse
    Florence Wyle’s bronze sculptures depict women and men at work on the home front. From top to bottom: Woman With Adapter; Furnace Man. For sculptor Florence Wyle, WW I brought welcome relief from chronic poverty. It came in the form of a commission from the...
  • Allied Bombing In Normandy: Army, Part 23

    November 1, 1998 by Terry Copp
    The ongoing debate over the role of Bomber Command in WW II generally ignores the contribution made to the direct defeat of the German army. If the role of heavy bombers in Normandy is discussed the emphasis is on the bombing of Caen or the...
  • Richard Jack

    September 1, 1998 by Jennifer Morse
    Richard Jack concentrated on the collective triumph rather than the individual agony of war. From top to bottom: Major Ronald I. Jack; The Taking of Vimy Ridge, Easter Monday, 1917; an untitled painting. Richard Jack was Canada’s first official war artist. Born in Sunderland, England,...
  • The Normandy Battle Of Attrition: Army, Part 22

    September 1, 1998 by Terry Copp
    The American military historian Stephen Ambrose has a new bestseller in the bookstores. It’s called Citizen Soldiers and in it he describes the United States Army from the Normandy landings to the surrender of Germany. Ambrose is one of a small, but growing group of...