Military History

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Canadians take Hill 70

The Battle of Hill 70 was a 10-day Canadian Corps victory in the First World War that came at a terrible cost to both sides. It began on Aug. 15, 1917, and by the end of the first day alone, 1,056 Canadians had been killed, 2,432 wounded and 39 taken prisoner. Lieutenant-General Arthur Currie...
  • Valour On The Somme: Part 5 of 18

    September 1, 2004 by Arthur Bishop
    ILLUSTRATIONS: SHARIF TARABAY Clockwise from top left: Victoria Cross recipients Thomas Wilkinson, Lionel Clarke, James Richardson and John Kerr. Das Blutbad the blood bath. The consummate German designation for those murderous battles of the Somme. During the last six months of 1916, over that part...
  • A High Flyer, Indeed: Air Force, Part 4

    July 1, 2004 by Hugh A. Halliday
    PHOTO: NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF CANADA–RE20365 A signed photograph of Ernest Lloyd Janney, taken in Toronto in 1915. The Canadian government’s pre-World War I military aviation policy was simple—there was none. Aircraft trials at Petawawa, Ont., in 1909 had ended in two crashes, and efforts by...
  • The Horrors Of Gas Warfare: Army, Part 53

    July 1, 2004 by Terry Copp
    Photo: national archives of canada Richard Jack’s painting, The Second Battle of Ypres, depicts the battle scene in 1915. While 1st Canadian Infantry Division was training and re-equipping in England, the war on the Western Front had become stalemated. Trenches began to stretch from the...
  • Saved By A Few Good Men: Navy, Part 4

    July 1, 2004 by Marc Milner
    PHOTO: NOTMAN STUDIO, national Archives of canada–PA028499 Members of the Royal Naval College of Canada’s class of 1912 practise rowing near Halifax. By the time Canada was at war in August 1914, only tiny Rainbow, her crew augmented by volunteers, was able to respond. Indeed,...
  • Arthur Lismer

    July 1, 2004 by Jennifer Morse
    CANADIAN WAR MUSEUM–AN19710261-0342 Minesweepers, Halifax. Prior to becoming famous as a founding member of the Group of Seven, Arthur Lismer sharpened his painting skills in Halifax during the last years of World War I. He had a brilliant summer palette, and produced oil paintings that...
  • The Class Of 1915: Part 4 of 18

    July 1, 2004 by Arthur Bishop
    Illustration: Sharif Tarabay Victoria Cross recipient Francis Alexander Scrimger. More than 70 Canadian Victoria Crosses were awarded during World War I, an incredible achievement for a country with less than nine million people. The first of those awards went to Michael O’Leary. Born in 1888...
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