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Canadians take Hill 70

The Battle of Hill 70 was a 10-day Canadian Corps victory in the First World War that came at a terrible cost to both sides. It began on Aug. 15, 1917, and by the end of the first day alone, 1,056 Canadians had been killed, 2,432 wounded and 39 taken prisoner. Lieutenant-General Arthur Currie...
  • Paraskeva Clark

    November 1, 2004 by Jennifer Morse
    CANADIAN WAR MUSEUM–AN19710261-0685 ‘Quaicker Girls’. Paraskeva Clark’s paintings depict activities of the Royal Canadian AirForce Women’s Division. Paraskeva Clark believed the art of a nation is not made by a few elite artists of the time, but by the many who give us variety in...
  • Vimy And More: Part 6 of 18

    November 1, 2004 by Arthur Bishop
    ILLUSTRATIONS: Sharif Tarabay Clockwise from top left: Victoria Cross recipients Frederick Maurice Watson Harvey, Robert Grierson Combe, Ellis Wellwood Sifton, John George Pattison, William Johnstone Milne and Thain Wendell MacDowell. The Battle of Vimy Ridge, which historian George Nasmith called “probably the most brilliant success...
  • The Imperial Gift: Air Force, Part 5

    September 1, 2004 by Hugh A. Halliday
    PHOTO: NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF CANADA—PA53249 The engine is changed in a Felixstowe F.3 flying boat at Victoria Beach, Man., in August 1922. In 1919-20, the British government presented hundreds of airplanes and associated equipment to several of its dominions. In Canada and Australia, these assets...
  • Niobe’s Brief Operational Career: Navy, Part 5

    September 1, 2004 by Marc Milner
    PHOTO: NOTMAN STUDIO, national Archives of canada—PA028497 Niobe sits in dry dock prior to her service in World War I. Part 5 As war clouds gathered over Europe in July 1914, the Royal Canadian Navy’s only East Coast ship—HMCS Niobe—lay mouldering alongside the dockyard in...
  • Trench Warfare In 1915: Army, Part 54

    September 1, 2004 by Terry Copp
    PHOTO: HORACE BROWN, NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF CANADA—PA107276 Canadian troops share a smoke in the trenches in France in 1915. The last elements of 1st Canadian Infantry Division left the Ypres salient on May 4, 1915, having suffered just over 6,000 casualties. One Canadian battalion, the...
  • Dorothy Stevens

    September 1, 2004 by Jennifer Morse
    CANADIAN WAR MUSEUM—AN19710261-0955 Munitions—Fuse Factory. The early decades of the 20th century were a time of momentous change for women in Canada. During World War I, women were not recruited as official war artists. Instead, female artists were limited to commissions on subjects deemed appropriate...
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