Military Milestones

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The death of a poet and fighter pilot

On Dec. 11, 1941, a 19-year-old pilot died in England. He had been in service only 10 weeks, had seen combat only once, and as far as anyone knows, inflicted no damage on the enemy. But he will never be forgotten as long as there are pilots who want to slip the surly bonds...
  • First CF-18 enters the fleet

    July 31, 2019 by Sharon Adams
    A huge red carpet cut in the shape of a maple leaf lay on a runway in St. Louis, Missouri, on July 28, 1982. Test pilot Jack Krings landed, then taxied a CF-18 Hornet onto that carpet, stopping just a few metres from the reviewing...
  • Canadians under fire in Cyprus

    July 24, 2019 by Sharon Adams
    Canadians had already been on peacekeeping duty in Cyprus for a decade when things really got hot the summer of 1974. It did not take long after Cyprus gained independence in 1960 for tensions to escalate between Greek and Turkish Cypriots, each favouring uniting with...
  • The Mac-Paps serve in Spain

    July 17, 2019 by Sharon Adams
    The Great Depression was a time of wild political idealism around the world. There was wide talk about the need for reform, or even a new social order. In Canada, a third of the labour force was unemployed, many people relied on government relief to...
  • The sinking of the Königsberg

    July 10, 2019 by Sharon Adams
    When the First World War broke out, Harold James Arnold was a wireless operator working in the remote Queen Charlotte Islands (now Haida Gwaii) off the west coast of British Columbia. In 1915, he earned a Distinguished Service Order for his actions July 6 and...
  • CBC covers the Battle of Carpiquet

    July 3, 2019 by Sharon Adams
    War correspondent Matthew Halton covered the Second World War for the CBC. Here is an extract from a recording of what he saw and heard during the Canadian attack on Carpiquet village and airfield July 4, 1944. “This is Matthew Halton of the CBC speaking...
  • The sinking of the Llandovery Castle

    June 26, 2019 by Sharon Adams
    On the night of June 27, 1918, 14 nursing sisters, all but two Canadian, died, victims of a war crime. The Canadian hospital ship Llandovery Castle was on its way back to England after delivering recovering soldiers to Halifax. It was running with full lights,...