Fallen rider

For nearly 70 years, Private John Willoughby lay where he fell on March 30, 1918, in Moreuil Wood near Amiens, France, a victim of machine-gun fire or sabre or bayonet. Or maybe all three. Lieutenant Gordon Flowerdew led 75 Lord Strathcona’s Horse (Royal Canadians) in one of the last great cavalry charges in history (see page 20) against...
  • Our man in Tehran

    January 22, 2018 by Sharon Adams
    In nearly two and a half centuries, the United States has recognized outstanding civilian achievements with the Congressional Gold Medal. It is a rare honour; just over 150 have been awarded to groups or individuals since 1776. Of those, just 31 have been struck for...
  • War on two wheels

    September 26, 2017 by Sharon Adams
    FIRST WORLD WAR Only a handful of motorcycles went across when the Canadians embarked for Europe, but by war’s end, thousands had been put to good use. Linemen used them to check telegraph wires, officers as transport, infantry for scouting. Their riders delivered medical supplies...
  • The club no one hopes to join

    August 22, 2017 by Sharon Adams
      Fighter pilot Captain Brian Bews was rehearsing for an air show in Lethbridge, Alta., on July 24, 2010, when one engine of his CF-18 Hornet died. He ejected only 90 metres from the ground; two seconds later, his jet was a fireball and he...
  • GNATs versus CATs

    June 16, 2017 by Sharon Adams
    For a couple of years into the Second World War, it looked like German U-boats might prevail in the Battle of the Atlantic by starving Britain of food, troops and supplies, and smoothing the way for an invasion of England. But by 1943, the Allies...
  • Mementoes from Afghanistan

    April 20, 2017 by Sharon Adams
    Uniforms, equipment and explosives are reminders of Canada’s involvement in Southwest Asia   Though fresh in memory, the war in Afghanistan has entered the annals of national history. Aside from personal mementoes brought home by military and civilian personnel, museums have begun building their collections...
  • Night terrors

    February 27, 2017 by Sharon Adams
    In moonless nights, silent as clouds, Zeppelins floated over Britain, the original stealth bombers, raining destruction on military targets and unsuspecting civilians. They flew so high it took planes of the day an hour to climb to their height, and when they got there, their...
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