Army

Opening the Estuary

Britain’s XXX Corps closed in on Antwerp on Aug. 30, 1944, General Bernard Montgomery decided it was unnecessary to open the Belgian city’s massive port to Allied shipping. So, despite the liberation of the city on Sept. 2, no advance north of the Albert Canal was attempted. This left the 80-kilometre estuary—at the tidal...
  • Taking Walcheren Island: Army, Part 38

    November 1, 2001 by Terry Copp
    The words Luctor et Emergo, which translate into I struggle and I emerge, were emblazoned on the crest of Zeeland long before World War II began. Much of Zeeland, the southernmost province of the Netherlands, is below sea level and the land must be protected...
  • The Battle North Of Antwerp: Army, Part 37

    September 1, 2001 by Terry Copp
      Pipers play a lament at the burial of 55 members of the Black Watch following the fighting in October. On Oct. 2, 1944, General Guy Simonds, who had temporarily replaced an ailing Gen. Harry Crerar, issued his first directive as the acting commander of...
  • An 8th Reconnaissance Regiment anti-tank crew helps guard the road near Dunkirk on Sept. 16, 1944. During September 1944, 2nd Canadian Infantry Division was involved in a series of very tough battles in northern France. On the morning of the 7th, the 8th Cdn. Reconnaissance...
  •   The World War II battle for the Breskens Pocket, code named Operation Switchback, was the crucial first stage in the struggle to open the Port of Antwerp in Belgium. It began at dawn on Oct. 6, 1944, when 7th Canadian Infantry Brigade crossed the...
  • Crossing The Leopold: Army, Part 34

    January 1, 2001 by Terry Copp
    Buffalo amphibious vehicles enter the water during the battle to clear the Scheldt estuary in October 1944. The battle to clear the Scheldt estuary and allow full use of the port of Antwerp in Belgium has long been recognized as one of the most important...
  • The Liberation Of Belgium: Army, Part 33

    November 1, 2000 by Terry Copp
    Canadian Sergeant L.K. Woods (left) and Private M.S. Perkins visit children in Furnes, Belgium, 1944. September 1944 is remembered as the month of Arnhem, the “bridge too far”, or by Canadians as the time of the battles for the Channel ports. But for the veterans...