Mystery of the lucky Lancaster

It was just six weeks before the end of the Second World War when the telegram arrived for the Lee family in Winnipeg, all capital letters, like someone shouting to be heard above a rising internal wail: REGRET TO ADVISE THAT YOUR SON FLYING OFFICER JIM GEN LEE…IS REPORTED MISSING AFTER AIR OPERATIONS OVERSEAS...
  • The Search For The Magnetic Pole: Air Force, Part 41

    October 24, 2010 by Hugh A. Halliday
    On July 19, 1947, a Canso aircraft took off from Royal Canadian Air Force Station Rockcliffe on a quest to define the unsteady location of the North Magnetic Pole. The Arctic mission, which would encounter everything from gales to menacing ice to unchartered terrain, was...
  • Arctic Investigations: Air Force, Part 40

    August 25, 2010 by Hugh A. Halliday
    “It is considered that North West Air Command should examine the Northwest Territories in the interests of the safe and efficient conducting of air, land and sea rescue operations in the future. Such action is considered to be in line with the recent Cabinet Decision...
  • Burma Campaign Veterans To Be Honoured

    July 1, 2010 by Legion Magazine
    It has been 65 years since the end of the Second World War, and this year’s commemorations in Ottawa for VJ-Day (Victory over Japan Day) will include special focus on Canadian veterans of the Burma...
  • Lancasters Hit Civvy Street: Air Force, Part 39

    June 19, 2010 by Hugh A. Halliday
    Many Second World War aircraft became object lessons in beating swords into ploughshares. Once the Cold War developed, many such ploughshares were hastily reconverted to swords. Such was the case of the Avro Lancaster in Royal Canadian Air Force postwar...
  • The Problems With Vampires: Air Force, Part 38

    April 24, 2010 by Hugh A. Halliday
    In April 1945 there was a new kid on the block. The De Havilland Vampire jet, which had been test-flown as a prototype on Sept. 20, 1943, was in mass production, and soon the Royal Canadian Air Force would acquire one for winter trials at...
  • The Roar Of The Meteor: Air Force, Part 37

    February 21, 2010 by Hugh A. Halliday
    Gloster Meteor Mk VIIIs at Kabrit, Egypt, in 1952. PHOTO: LEGION MAGAZINE ARCHIVES Although the first flights of German and British jet engine test beds occurred 21 months apart, the two nations introduced jet fighters into service at almost the same time—July 1944. But both...

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