Mystery of the lucky Lancaster

It was just six weeks before the end of the Second World War when the telegram arrived for the Lee family in Winnipeg, all capital letters, like someone shouting to be heard above a rising internal wail: REGRET TO ADVISE THAT YOUR SON FLYING OFFICER JIM GEN LEE…IS REPORTED MISSING AFTER AIR OPERATIONS OVERSEAS...
  • Killing MiGs In Korea

    September 24, 2013 by Hugh A. Halliday
    It may suprise some that all three branches of the Canadian armed forces were busy in the cold, turbulent air over Korea between 1950 and 1953. Their experiences are not well known, but they did their duty by attacking ground targets and engaging MiG-15s. The transpacific...
  • Operation Hawk: The Korean Airlift

    August 7, 2013 by Hugh A. Halliday
    In 1947, while Prime Minister Mackenzie King was in London, his Minister of Foreign Affairs (and chosen successor), Louis St-Laurent, consented to Canadian participation on the United Nations Temporary Commission of Korea (UNTOK). On his return to Canada, King furiously confronted St-Laurent. He wanted no...
  • Icy Latitudes: The Duty Of The Lost Legion

    June 7, 2013 by Hugh A. Halliday
    One of the most conspicuous aspects of the Lost Legion—the Royal Canadian Air Force personnel who served outside of RCAF units during the Second World War—is the remoteness of many locations. From tiny, dusty airstrips to frigid radar stations, these Canadians gained little attention while...
  • During the Second World War, Royal Canadian Air Force squadrons flew many types of aircraft in a variety of roles. Looking over this history, it is worth noting that no Canadian squadron operated in the medium-bomber role closely identified with tactical bombing. The greater part...
  • Lost In The RAF: Air Force, Part 55

    January 15, 2013 by Hugh A. Halliday
    It is often mentioned that 60 per cent of all Royal Canadian Air Force personnel overseas during the Second World War served in Royal Air Force units. This “fact” requires some explanation and qualification. It would probably be more accurate to say that, at one...
  • The Men Who Sank The Tirpitz: Air Force, Part 54

    November 28, 2012 by Hugh A. Halliday
    Thousands of Royal Canadian Air Force aircrew served in Bomber Command throughout the Second World War. Although 15 Canadian squadrons existed within that formation, many RCAF personnel flew in non-RCAF units, including in squadrons that fought the mighty German battleship...
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