Air Force

Pilots Down

Canada’s most up-to-date aircraft in 1939 was the Northrop Delta, manufactured under licence by Canadian Vickers Ltd. in Montreal. It was about the size of a de Havilland DHC-3 Otter—a large, single-engine, low-wing monoplane, powerful and fast. Although noisy and said to be nose-heavy, the Delta was a versatile aircraft and pilots generally spoke...
  • The Imperial Gift: Air Force, Part 5

    September 1, 2004 by Hugh A. Halliday
    PHOTO: NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF CANADA—PA53249 The engine is changed in a Felixstowe F.3 flying boat at Victoria Beach, Man., in August 1922. In 1919-20, the British government presented hundreds of airplanes and associated equipment to several of its dominions. In Canada and Australia, these assets...
  • A High Flyer, Indeed: Air Force, Part 4

    July 1, 2004 by Hugh A. Halliday
    PHOTO: NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF CANADA–RE20365 A signed photograph of Ernest Lloyd Janney, taken in Toronto in 1915. The Canadian government’s pre-World War I military aviation policy was simple—there was none. Aircraft trials at Petawawa, Ont., in 1909 had ended in two crashes, and efforts by...
  • The Birth Of Missile Defence: Air Force, Part 3

    May 1, 2004 by Hugh A. Halliday
    From top: A Canadian soldier stands guard over debris from a V-2 rocket that fell near the docks in Antwerp, Belgium; A member of the French resistance examines a damaged V-1 rocket near Foucarmont, France, in 1944 In November 1939, British authorities acquired a summary...
  • Eyes In The Skies: Air Force, Part 2

    March 1, 2004 by Hugh A. Halliday
    Enemy positions were also observed with the use of balloons during WW I. This photo was taken in September 1916 The literature of World War I aviation history is filled with accounts of fighter pilots, more particularly the famous aces like Manfred von Richthofen and...
  • The Aries Flights Of 1945: Air Force, Part 1

    January 1, 2004 by Hugh A. Halliday
    After her modification for scientific research, Aries sits at a Canadian airport in 1945. Inset: Wing Commander Kenneth Maclure. In the closing months of World War II the Empire Air Navigation School, Shawbury, Shropshire, was more than a school; it was a centre for research...
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