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Home Front

The brewing battle

In the summer of 1941, Matthew H. Halton, a Toronto Star war correspondent, arrived in Solum, an Egyptian village near the Mediterranean Sea, just east of the border with Libya.

Ready To Serve

When Canada declared war on Germany on Sept. 10, 1939, Canadian women were quick to voice an interest in becoming involved in the war effort. As Alice Sorby of Winnipeg so picturesquely expressed it, “In September 1939 when the thunder of war first crashed about our ears, the immediate reaction was an almost hysterical desire to do something.” (Women’s Work, May/June)

The Gift of Air Power

Two airmen with Garfield Weston Spitfire SVI. PHOTO: WESTON CORPORATE ARCHIVES One misty morning last year, Belfast amateur aviation historian Jonny McNee was in County

The Morale Department

Members of the Canadian Postal Corps in 1916. PHOTO: LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES CANADA—PA066823 One Sunday morning, early in March 1915, Cooper Antliff of 41 St. Mark

Women’s Work

When we think of war we usually think of men—and now women as well—fighting battles on land and sea and in the air. All too often we forget that for these combatants to fight millions of people are required to work behind the front line to provide them with supplies of food, clothing and weaponry and to fill positions the combatants occupied before joining the armed forces. In Canada, during the Second World War, this vital role was filled by hundreds of thousands of women on the home front—in the armed forces, the volunteer sector, war industries, the civilian labour force and agriculture.

The Happiest Prisoners

Prisoners look out from behind barbed wire at Sherbrooke, Que., in 1945. PHOTO: LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES CANADA—PA163788 In the shadow of Mount Baldy, where lodgepole

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