Canada Corner

Lord Stanley’s cup(s)
Canada Corner, O Canada

Lord Stanley’s cup(s)

When Frederick Stanley, 16th Earl of Derby, was Governor General of Canada, he donated a trophy—known originally as the Dominion Hockey Challenge Cup—for Canada’s best amateur hockey club. It became known as the Stanley Cup. Lord Frederick Stanley of Preston, Canada’s Governor General from 1888 to 1893, saw his first hockey game on Feb. 4, 1889, and like so many of us, he was hooked.  Three years later, he donated a trophy to be awarded to the best hockey team in the country. The gold-lined silver bowl was 18.5 centimetres tall and cost $48.67. On May 15, 1893, the first Cup was awarded to a Montreal team (quelle surprise!)—the Montreal Athletic Association.  Among early winners were the Winnipeg Victorias, Montreal Wanderers, Kenora Thistles, Vancouver Millionaires and Ottawa Sen...
Rugged Workhorse
Home Front

Rugged Workhorse

From the Sahara to Normandy, Canadian Military Pattern trucks kept armies supplied and moving The Desert Fox, General Erwin Rommel, had to make a decision. It was June 1942 and after mauling Britain’s Eighth Army in the Western Desert campaign, the commander of Germany’s Panzer Army Africa was at the end of his logistical support.   Rommel was a brilliant tactician, but his strategic vision was dulled by the defeat he inflicted on the British in Libya, forcing them to retreat to El Alamein, Egypt, a shot-up railway station along the Mediterranean coast. He decided to make one last effort to crack British defences and have his Panzer forces roll through Egypt to the Nile. But first he had to capture Tobruk, Libya, and gain the stores and petrol left by the retreating British—supplies...
Broken Arrow
Canada Corner, Military History

Broken Arrow

Brilliant and blazingly fast, the CF-105 was ahead of its time—and short-lived During the height of the Cold War in the 1950s, there was a growing concern that Soviet bombers would attack North America via the shortest route, over the Canadian Arctic. NATO intelligence suggested that such an attack could occur as early as 1954. So, in 1953, the Royal Canadian Air Force commissioned the A.V. Roe Canada Ltd. aircraft manufacturing company in Malton, Ont., to design and build a fighter plane that could operate in any weather, fly at twice the speed of sound, execute a 2G turn at 50,000 feet without losing speed or altitude, and fire a missile at oncoming bombers. It was, at the time, the most demanding specification in the world, and many international manufacturers believed it couldn’t...
“Canada and the liberation of the Netherlands” – Awarded Gold for Best Interactive Story 2020!
Multi-media Features

“Canada and the liberation of the Netherlands” – Awarded Gold for Best Interactive Story 2020!

At the 2020 Canadian Online Publishing Awards held virtually on Feb. 4 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Legion Magazine was awarded Gold for Best Interactive Story for “Canada and the liberation of the Netherlands” The win marks the fourth time in the past five years Legion Magazine has won awards in this category, with a Gold in 2018 for "Prisoners of War",  a Gold in 2017 for “Cold Comfort” and a Silver in 2016 for “Blood in the Mud.” To explore all of our multi-media features, visit: https://legionmagazine.com/en/category/canada-corner/multimedia-features/
“The October Crisis” – Awarded Silver for Best Interactive Story 2020!
Multi-media Features

“The October Crisis” – Awarded Silver for Best Interactive Story 2020!

At the 2020 Canadian Online Publishing Awards held virtually on Feb. 4 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Legion Magazine was awarded Silver for Best Interactive Story for “The October Crisis” The win marks the fourth time in the past five years Legion Magazine has won awards in this category, with a Gold in 2018 for "Prisoners of War",  a Gold in 2017 for “Cold Comfort” and a Silver in 2016 for “Blood in the Mud.” To explore all of our multi-media features, visit: https://legionmagazine.com/en/category/canada-corner/multimedia-features/
Canada’s Bletchley Park
Home Front, Military History

Canada’s Bletchley Park

Ottawa had its own top-secret code-breaking establishment In 1942, David Hayne, a recent University of Toronto graduate, was undergoing artillery training at Camp Niagara in Ontario when he received two mysterious letters that changed the course of his life and helped place Canada in the forefront of intelligence gathering. The first was from a professor of French who asked Hayne if he would fill an opening at the National Research Council (NRC). There was no indication of what the work involved, only that it was connected with the war and that the letter writer found it absorbing. The young grad concluded that the job related to the French language, his passion. Still, he dispatched a cautious reply, saying he expected to begin his military career almost immediately. That letter...

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