Humour Hunt

A good laugh stands the test of time. One of Legion Magazine’s most popular features has been the column Humour Hunt which is compiled from reminiscences and bits of humour sent in by our readers. The column has run continuously since February 1982. We hope you will enjoy some samples from past columns.

Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

Mac Ruttan of Ottawa tells us the following appeared in the personal column of Navy News, the Royal Navy’s monthly publication.  “Lonely Lady (44) divorced, lost and adrift, needs capable unattached skipper to take her in tow.  Reply Box No….”
Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

B.E. Smith of London, Ont., submitted a story from his navy days: His captain found defaulters pretty monotonous. So, to add some zest to the proceedings, he announced he would dismiss any case with a truly original excuse–the rest might better plead guilty.  One morning, when their carrier was anchored off Kingston, Jamaica, the short patrol gave evidence that one sailor, charged with being drunk on shore, had staggered down the jetty and straight off the deep end. Speaking on his own behalf, he said, “I wasn’t drunk, Sir.” “You weren’t drunk?” responded the captain.  “How is it, then, that you tried to walk out to the ship?” “I wasn’t trying to walk, Sir.  I tried to jump.” “Case dismissed.”
Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

Mac Ruttan of Ottawa tells us of a Captain Jonathan Pearce of the Royal Artillery who was serving in the garrison at Gilbraltar. He was accidently shot and killed by his batman who was subsequently exonerated of all blame by a court of inquiry. The authorities notified Capt. Pearce’s next-of-kin and asked what inscription they would like engraved on his headstone. The family, having only been advised that he died in the course of duty, replied with remarkable, albeit possibly unfortunate, insight that it would like the inscription to read: “Well Done Thou Good And Faithful Servant.”

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