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Liberation

Feted with parades and banquets, flowers and wine, the Canadian liberation of the Netherlands was a joyous time—though not far from the shadow of war

Brass Hats in Red Tape

Brass Hats in Red Tape By Wilfrid Bovey February 1954 The task of the officers responsible for the administration of the Canadian troops in Britain

A Lucky Presentiment

A Lucky Presentiment By G.A. Mitchell (D Company, 78th Battlalion, C.E.F.) January 1954 Undoubtedly there are many who do not believe in presentiment, but a

Letter From Vimy

Letter From Vimy By Gordon MacKinnon April 1992 The envelope of my grandfather’s last letter to my uncle, Private Ronald MacKinnon of the Princess Patricia’s

Uncle’s Song

Uncle’s Song By Dr. R. Byrnes Fleuty April 1989 ‘We would sooner f— than fight.’ That’s Uncle’s favourite song these days. He says he doesn’t

FRANCE: THE FIRST TIME

FRANCE: THE FIRST TIME By Hugh Laughlin April 1989   School principal Hugh Laughlin of Chilliwack, B.C., pulled no punches in letters home from the

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Cannons and Cutlasses: The Great Lakes Battles

During the War of 1812, the inland seas of North America—the Great Lakes—were the setting for major maritime operations. Both Britain and the United States devoted tremendous energy and resources to creating naval forces on the lakes as water provided the best means of transporting and supplying land forces. Naval bases sprung up almost overnight and ship construction was maintained at a dizzying pace. At the outbreak of war, the U.S. had exactly one warship on the Great Lakes, a 16-gun vessel on Lake Ontario. By 1814, it had 28 major warships, the largest mounting 58 guns. The Royal Navy expanded in a similar proportion. In 1814 the U.S. Navy constructed and commissioned a warship on Lake Champlain in the amazing time of 33 days, while Britain built a battleship, HMS St. Lawrence, on Lake Ontario that was larger than HMS Victory, Nelson’s flagship at Trafalgar.

Medical care in the wars of the future

The challenges of battlefield medicine are about to change for Western allied nations, now that the focus of threats has migrated to China, Russia, Iran and North

Remembering Indigenous war heroes

Their ancestors fought beside the British in the Seven Years’ War, the American Revolution and the War of 1812. In 1885, they navigated Africa’s Nile

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An informative primer on Canada’s crucial role in the Normandy landing, June 6, 1944.