NEW! Canadian Military History Trivia Challenge

Day: July 26, 2022

The Dieppe Mountie
Memoirs, Our Veterans

The Dieppe Mountie

An RCMP constable who volunteered for overseas service recalls the infamous raid in his own words Captain Edward Hammond Stevenson commanded the Dieppe detachment of No. 2 Provost Company, a military police unit that was to help direct troops and keep the beach orderly during Operation Jubilee—until the raid went disastrously wrong. As a constable in Winnipeg, he had volunteered for service overseas, interrupting his career with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police from November 1939 to February 1946. He was discharged from the army with the rank of major and returned to the RCMP, eventually becoming assistant commissioner. After the war, he wrote this account of his experiences of that fateful day, Aug. 19, 1942. It is published here for the first time. As the 2nd Canadian Division h...
Unfit for action overseas during WW I, Albert Goodwin fought at home for workers’ rights
Military History, Military Milestones

Unfit for action overseas during WW I, Albert Goodwin fought at home for workers’ rights

Albert Goodwin, known as “Ginger,” due to his red hair, emigrated to Canada in 1906 and began working in a mine on Vancouver Island. The company Goodwin worked for paid white miners about $4 a day, support workers less and Chinese workers a fraction of that. Conditions were brutal—men and boys died in explosions and rockfalls, or from breathing toxic vapours. Coal dust inhaled over years settles into the lungs, scarring them. The scars continue to grow until miners develop breathing problems, commonly known as black lung disease. The resulting lack of oxygen affects internal organs, particularly the heart and brain. It was a miserable way to earn a living and a worse way to die. In the early 1900s, miners in British Columbia felt their wages did not reflect the danger of their ...
Battle of the Atlantic: A U-boat hunter remembers
Front Lines

Battle of the Atlantic: A U-boat hunter remembers

  They’d be there when Able Seaman Elmer Auld landed on the bridge for his early-morning watch aboard the corvette Giffard—seven U-boats somewhere out in the mid-Atlantic, beyond the cover of air patrols, in an area known as “The Black Hole.” Then, almost as if they had waited for his arrival on deck, the German wolf packs would disappear beneath the waves and “it”—the hunt—was on. Auld, a native of Port Arthur, now part of Thunder Bay, Ont., was the hunter, a teenaged ASDIC operator on the notorious North Atlantic Run, escorting convoys of merchant ships between St. John’s, Nfld., and the British Isles. The ASDIC set, an early form of sonar, used echolocation to find submarines. Auld would scan the ocean ahead on an arc, transmitting the telltale pings every 10 degrees...

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An informative primer on Canada’s crucial role in the Normandy landing, June 6, 1944.