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Day: July 12, 2022

Canadian military breaks with tradition, changes dress codes
Front Lines

Canadian military breaks with tradition, changes dress codes

Anxious to attract increasingly reticent recruits and bring dated policies more in line with evolving societal norms, the Canadian Armed Forces have announced new dress codes, with an emphasis on being gender-neutral. That means traditional short hair is out—unless you prefer it that way. Soldiers, sailors and aircrew can now grow their manes as long and in whatever colour they want, provided they don’t cover their faces or impede operational performance. “The colour and the length of your hair does not define your quality as a soldier and aviator and sailor." “We cannot define our soldiers by short hair anymore,” said Major-General Lise Bourgon, acting chief of military personnel. “The colour and the length of your hair does not define your quality as a soldier and aviator and sailor...
A memorable July 1944 dogfight
Military Milestones

A memorable July 1944 dogfight

Flight Lieutenant Cecil Brown, of Mississauga, Ont., had a bird’s-eye view of the D-Day invasion. “On D-Day…the role of our 127 Wing, RCAF was to provide close cover for the beachhead armies against enemy aircraft,” he recalled in Jean E. Portugal’s We Were There—RCAF and Others. The wing consisted of three squadrons—403 (Wolf), 416 (City of Oshawa) and 421 (Red Indian). “I was with 403 Squadron and I was 26 years old. “The Wing did four patrols on D-Day, but I did two, one at noon and another around 8 p.m. All our aircraft were OK. “It was a magnificent sight to see the naval and airborne forces go toward the beach. Hundreds of Dakotas towing gliders and carrying paratroops; Thunderbolts and Typhoons and Mustangs doing dive bombings just inside the beachhead. Hundreds of landi...

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An informative primer on Canada’s crucial role in the Normandy landing, June 6, 1944.