NEW! Canadian Military History Trivia Challenge

Day: June 1, 2022

Warfighting at Mont Sorrel
Military History, Military Milestones

Warfighting at Mont Sorrel

Mount Sorrel and two nearby hills were the last elevated positions held in the Ypres Salient at the start of June 1916. In the next two weeks Canadian forces would lose and recapture the high ground. Nearly 4,000 would die there and more than 5,000 would be wounded. On the morning of June 2, German artillery bombed and set off mines along a kilometre of the Canadian front. The iron rain lasted four and a half hours, during which time entire sections of trench and the soldiers in them were vapourized and torn apart. Among the dead was Major General Malcolm Mercer. “It would be bad enough to be killed in a fair fight, but we didn’t relish being buried alive.” The 1st and 4th Battalions, Canadian Mounted Rifles, suffered more than 80 per cent casualties. Of the survivors, 536 were ...
Hell and high water: When high-tech bows to age-old tactics in Ukraine war
Defence Today, Front Lines

Hell and high water: When high-tech bows to age-old tactics in Ukraine war

The villagers of Demydiv are being credited with saving Kyiv from what could have been a decisive attack after they flooded their own neighbourhoods and surrounding fields in the weeks after Russian forces invaded Ukraine. With Russian designs on the capital of almost three million now all but abandoned, the village of fewer than 2,500 is still cleaning up wet basements, soggy carpets and the saturated fields that had formed a quagmire the invaders—with all their technology, tanks and heavy tracked vehicles—could not cross. The tactic, whereby locals and Ukrainian army engineers opened a dam on the Dnieper River, is almost as old as war itself and created something of a welcome disaster for Demydiv and environs. Turning the approaches and a main road to Kyiv into a swamp, it thwar...

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An informative primer on Canada’s crucial role in the Normandy landing, June 6, 1944.