NEW! Canadian Military History Trivia Challenge

Day: May 17, 2022

The Parliament bombing of 1966
Military History, Military Milestones

The Parliament bombing of 1966

On May 18, 1966, a lone man left the public galleries of the House of Commons during a debate and went to the men’s washroom on the third floor. Then he lit the fuse on a dynamite bomb. But Paul Joseph Chartier had miscalculated exactly how long it would take the wick to burn. Instead of his likely intended victims—politicians on the floor of the House—the 44-year-old accidentally blew himself up. A note was found in his pocket, beginning with “When I am president of Canada….” He had written a 23-page letter to the Edmonton Journal saying that, before becoming president, he intended to kill as many members of Parliament as possible. Weeks earlier, he had written to the clerk of the House asking to address MPs from the floor; he was turned down. He had lived in a rooming house in T...
Scientists claim to have solved mystery of Gulf War illness
Front Lines

Scientists claim to have solved mystery of Gulf War illness

A team of American scientists claims to have solved the mystery of Gulf War illness in a detailed genetic study that points the finger of blame at sarin nerve gas. The researchers at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center’s epidemiology division in Dallas not only found that veterans exposed to sarin during the Persian Gulf War were more likely to develop problems associated with the illness, they also discovered the risk was regulated by a gene that can enable some people’s bodies to better break down the nerve agent. The study was headed by Dr. Robert Haley, a professor of internal medicine and the division director who has been studying Gulf War illness (GWI) for 28 years. His group’s findings were published in Environmental Health Perspectives, a peer-reviewed journal su...
Should Canada have settled its civil suit with Omar Khadr?
Face to Face

Should Canada have settled its civil suit with Omar Khadr?

Howard Anglin says NO Omar Khadr was captured 20 years ago during the War in Afghanistan when he was 15. He was detained by the U.S. military for 10 years and repatriated to Canada in 2012. A year later, he sued the Canadian government, accusing it of violating his rights. In 2017, the government settled his lawsuit for $10.5 million. Debates about the settlement are difficult because they are usually derailed by related, but not necessarily relevant, feelings about everything from Canada’s participation in Afghanistan and the broader “war on terrorism” to one’s views of the Chrétien or Harper governments.  Emotional reactions to Khadr’s case are natural, whether it’s sympathy with Khadr for being raised in a terrorist household or anger at his association with al-Qaida, from assem...

Sign up today for a FREE download of Canada’s War Stories

Free e-book

An informative primer on Canada’s crucial role in the Normandy landing, June 6, 1944.