NEW! Canadian Military History Trivia Challenge

Day: May 3, 2022

Bolting for the Baltic
Army, Military History, Military Milestones

Bolting for the Baltic

How a Canadian battalion’s mad dash to northern Germany at the end of the war stopped Soviet advances toward the West Wismar, located on Germany’s Baltic coast, holds a fascinating but little-known place in Canadian Second World War history. It’s where Canadian troops first encountered the Red Army—and effectively blocked a Soviet advance into Denmark.    Until Germany’s reunification in 1990, travel to Wismar was difficult for foreigners. It was located about 40 kilo- metres behind the Iron Curtain, in what was then known as the Bezirk Rostock region of the Deutsche Demokratische Republik—or East Germany as it was known in the West. After the war, Wismar became one of the East’s largest ports with a well-developed shipbuilding industry. It was also a garrison town and home to two...
HMCS Uganda: the ship that voted its way home
Military History, Military Milestones

HMCS Uganda: the ship that voted its way home

The only Canadian ship to fight against the Japanese in the Second World War, HMCS Uganda also had the distinction of being the only ship to vote itself out of that war. Uganda was one of the mightiest ships in the Canadian navy, 169 metres long, armed to the teeth with nine six-inch guns, eight four-inch guns and many smaller guns, plus torpedoes. Its crew of 907 officers and men were chosen from every province of Canada and the Dominion of Newfoundland. Captain Edmond Rollo Mainguy was in command. The ship, a former British vessel named for what was then a British colony, began service in the Royal Navy, but was transferred to Canada in late-1944, then, ironically, was sent to join the British Pacific Fleet in the war against Japan. In May 1945, as the fighting was ending in Eur...
Global military expenditures eclipse US$2 trillion in 2021 for first time
Defence Today, Front Lines

Global military expenditures eclipse US$2 trillion in 2021 for first time

The fiscal ravages of the pandemic had little practical effect on worldwide military spending in 2021, as it passed US$2 trillion (C$2.5 trillion) for the first time, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute reported on April 25. The list of the five biggest spenders bore no surprises: the United States led the way, followed by China, India, the United Kingdom and Russia. Together, they accounted for 62 per cent of all military spending, said the institute. “Even amid the economic fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic, world military spending hit record levels.” The organization studies conflict, arms control, armaments and disarmament. Its most recent accounting tallied total military spending at a record $2.1 trillion-plus—a 0.7 per cent real-term increase (an apple-to-apple ...

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An informative primer on Canada’s crucial role in the Normandy landing, June 6, 1944.