NEW! Canadian Military History Trivia Challenge

Day: March 15, 2022

Insidious influence
Canada and the new Cold War, Defence Today

Insidious influence

China’s operatives and hackers have been busy Recent events have led many Canadians to understand that China has become more aggressive in pursuit of its interests. The 33-month detention of Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor hit home. So has Beijing’s territorial demands on its neighbours, its fishing fleet’s encroachment on other countries’ territorial waters, its illegal construction of artificial islands in the South China Sea, its threats against Taiwan and its hacking of government and corporate computer networks. All are signs of a much more aggressive China. Recent polling demonstrates that Canadian public opinion has hardened significantly against President Xi Jinping and his government’s policies. Seventy-six per cent of respondents to a Globe and Mail/Nanos poll in October o...
French developer plans condo complex on Juno Beach
Defence Today, Front Lines

French developer plans condo complex on Juno Beach

A French developer is planning to build a 70-unit condominium at the site where Canadian troops landed on D-Day, desecrating what opponents to the project are calling hallowed ground. Local authorities in Courseulles-sur-Mer awarded a construction permit for Domaine des Dunes in February 2019. The two four-storey buildings are to go up just metres from Juno Beach, where Canadian soldiers fought and died during the June 6, 1944, invasion that marked the beginning of the end of Adolf Hitler’s reign of terror. “To build condos on the memorial site is just an enormous insult to the memory of the Canadians.” The units and a parking lot are to be built by Foncim next to the Juno Beach Centre, Canada’s primary Second World War museum and commemorative site in Europe. Museum lawyers have been...
Fighting at forts of the Niagara front
Military History, Military Milestones

Fighting at forts of the Niagara front

The Niagara River runs roughly south-north between Lake Ontario and Lake Erie, a vital transportation—and once communication—line in the Great Lakes. To safeguard their interests, Europeans bent on colonization and economic gain built forts at the river’s source on Lake Erie and its mouth on Lake Ontario. In 1812, the river marked the border between the state of New York and the British colony of Upper Canada. The United States wanted to erase that border and absorb Canada—or British North America as it was known as the time—into its union. The guns at nearby Black Rock fired across the Niagara at Fort Erie. The British answered in kind. Though the War of 1812 ranged widely, reaching the capitals in the U.S. and Upper Canada, the Niagara River was of great strategic importance during ...

Sign up today for a FREE download of Canada’s War Stories

Free e-book

An informative primer on Canada’s crucial role in the Normandy landing, June 6, 1944.