NEW! Canadian Military History Trivia Challenge

Day: March 8, 2022

Choose our cover for the May/June issue of Legion Magazine!
Choose our cover

Choose our cover for the May/June issue of Legion Magazine!

Help choose the May/June cover of Legion Magazine! The next issue of Legion Magazine includes the Postwar Netherlands, Fighting floods in B.C., Canada's Defence Dilemma and much more! Help choose our cover! Cast your vote, give us your opinion, and share with your friends on social media! Loading…
Placing the displaced
Canada Corner, Home Front

Placing the displaced

An early refugee support group helped open Canada to victims of Nazi persecution Canadians tend to think of Canada as a compassionate, hospitable country that has always welcomed refugees and immigrants. If so, they are wrong. In the 1930s, for example, Canada closed its doors to thousands of desperate refugees, many of them Jews fleeing persecution and danger at the hands of the Nazis. One example of such danger was Kristallnacht, the night of broken glass, when the Nazis unleashed their worst pogrom to date. On that infamous night, Nov. 9, 1938, hundreds of synagogues, Jewish shops and homes throughout Germany were torched. Scores of Jewish men, women and children were killed—shot or beaten—while trying to escape death by flames. Following Kristallnacht, some 30,000 Jews were sent t...
The taking of Xanten
Military History, Military Milestones

The taking of Xanten

By the spring of 1945, the Allies had driven German troops into a defensive pocket near Wesel, on the Rhine’s west bank. But there was hard and bitter fighting yet to come before the Allies’ final thrust over the Rhine. In early March, the Canadians were assigned to take Xanten, established by the Romans in about 15 B.C. and the place from which the German 256th Infantry Division launched its 1940 invasion of the Netherlands.   It began with opening approaches to the town by Les Fusiliers Mont-Royal. Resistance was stiff. On March 3, a direct hit took out the wireless radio set and operator in the lead company. In a move that would earn him the Military Cross, the signals officer, Lieutenant Bernard Lafleur, lit out for the lead company, carrying a replacement wireless set...
Cocktails, anyone? How the Molotov cocktail came to be
Defence Today, Front Lines

Cocktails, anyone? How the Molotov cocktail came to be

More than 80 years ago, in November 1939 while the rest of the world’s attention was arrested by the escalating war with Adolf Hitler, Soviet Red Army troops invaded Finland. Yes, Finland. Back in Moscow, Soviet dictator Josef Stalin wanted to trade territories with Finnish President Kyösti Kallio, claiming the security of Leningrad, 32 kilometres from the countries’ border, was at stake. When Kallio said no, Stalin ordered an invasion. Many historians believe the Georgian revolutionary’s goal was to conquer the entire country, not just select territories. Finland put up a courageous fight. The Soviets suffered international condemnation, its military was slapped with a disproportionately high number of casualties (5:1) yet, in the end, Stalin walked away with nine per cent of Fin...

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