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Day: February 8, 2022

Battle over the fiords of Norway
Military History, Military Milestones

Battle over the fiords of Norway

In Boyndie, a town on Scotland’s northeast coast a few kilometres inland from the North Sea, stands a granite obelisk. Fourteen names are inscribed on the stone, 10 of them Canadian. It is a memorial to the members of Banff Strike Wing who perished on Feb. 9, 1945, during the events of “Black Friday,” the date of the largest air battle over Norway and the deadliest day of the Second World War for the Royal Air Force Coastal Command. The fiords along Norway’s jagged coastline provided protection to German ships holed up for repair, gave a secure location for convoys to gather and allowed warships to sneak out under cover of cloud or storm to wreak havoc on the Allies. Banff Strike Wing spent the end of the war scouring the Norweigan coastline for German ships and convoys. Wing reco...
‘War,’ what is it good for?
Defence Today, Front Lines

‘War,’ what is it good for?

More than 50 years ago, with revolution in the air, peace protests sweeping North America and young Americans dying in Vietnam, Motown recording artist Edwin Starr famously posed the question: “War…what is it good for?” His answer, sung in defiance of those who would challenge him: “Absolutely nothing.” Indeed, author John Steinbeck once said that “all war is a symptom of man’s failure as a thinking animal.” More recently, American photojournalist Aaron Huey, who’d seen his share of conflict, described war as “the greatest failure of mankind.” Why, then, is there the constant need to invoke “war” whenever people seek to motivate others on a particular issue? There’s the war on drugs, which evidence suggests was something else altogether; the war on crime, which has tended to pe...
85th New Brunswick Convention
Blog, In the News, Our Veterans, Remembrance

85th New Brunswick Convention

Dedication and determination in New Brunswick Delegates met for the 85th New Brunswick Command convention at the Beaverbrook Kin Centre in Miramichi, N.B., on Sept. 18-19. The opening ritual was conducted by New Brunswick Command President Terry Campbell, who welcomed delegates and offered greetings to guests. Dominion President Bruce Julian declared the convention open. In the president’s report, Campbell outlined the command’s accomplishments during his two-year tenure. The organization worked to remain active while facing the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly with the numerous and ever-changing rules, he said. Technology was the answer and Zoom meetings became the norm.  “We have weathered the storm and come out the other side much stronger,” said Campbell. He...

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