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Month: January 2022

Afghan vets honoured with art exhibits
In the News, Our Veterans, Remembrance

Afghan vets honoured with art exhibits

Canadian and other coalition troops wounded during the war in Afghanistan are front and centre in two exhibitions currently showing in France and Canada.    In France, a combined exhibition of photographs and writings by a dozen wounded French veterans of the 20-year war opened on Oct. 18 and showed for 12 days at the Cercle National des Armées in Paris. The photographs, accompanied by memories, insights and descriptions written by the troops who took the pictures, depict life on a typical deployment fraught with danger. “They experienced the insidious threat of a suicide bomber, of their armoured vehicle exploding [on] an IED,” said a release. “Unlike [some of] their brothers in arms, they have emerged alive from attacks. “They left a part of [themselves] over there, far from their l...
Alberta’s first (real) oil boom
Canada Corner, O Canada

Alberta’s first (real) oil boom

May 1914, the Dingman well in Turner Valley, Alta., blew in, heralding an oil boom. Only 50 wells were drilled, but by summer there were 500 newly incorporated oil companies in Calgary. Few had any experience or equipment, but it didn’t stop them from selling shares to gullible investors. Some had jars of sewing machine oil in their storefront windows labelled, “Genuine Dingman Gold!”  But the Dingman well turned out to be a false spring. Little oil was found, and the companies vanished, leaving a trail of debt. In August 1914, war was declared and the boom was over. But the idea of oil remained, and for the next 33 years, oil companies continued to drill throughout Alberta, spending millions in the process. There were a handful of minor discoveries and thousands of dry holes.  Th...
Canada Post issues commemorative poppy stamp
Blog, In the News, News, Our Veterans, Remembrance

Canada Post issues commemorative poppy stamp

Canada Post has issued a stamp to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the adoption of the poppy as a symbol of remembrance in Canada.     The image on the stamp closely resembles the poppy distributed by The Royal Canadian Legion during the weeks leading up to Remembrance Day. The red ink was specially created to match the crimson of the flower worn by millions of Canadians every year, and a spot of metallic ink represents the pin used to attach it to lapels.   The stamp was issued to immortalize the flower and to give Canadians another way to honour the more than 117,000 Canadians who have died in service to their country, said a Canada Post press release.   The delicate but doughty flower that grew over the graves of fallen soldiers and on churned-up battlefields of the First World W...
Study shows impact of pandemic restrictions on long-term care homes
COVID-19, Health, In the News

Study shows impact of pandemic restrictions on long-term care homes

An ongoing study in Ontario is shedding light on how COVID-19 restrictions are impacting the quality of life of seniors and veterans in long-term care homes and their caregivers.   This data will help managers and policy-makers during future pandemics and disease outbreaks, said Annie Robitaille, who holds the research chair on frailty care at Perley Health in Ottawa (formerly the Perley and Rideau Veterans’ Health Centre). The research is not solely based at Perley Health, which is home to more than 600 seniors and veterans in long-term care. Research is being conducted at seven long-term care homes in order to illuminate the effects of different decisions and practices during the COVID-19 crisis on residents’ quality of life as well as the impacts on caregivers. The research has rece...
The pandemic’s toll on veterans
Blog, COVID-19, Health, In the News, Military Health Matters

The pandemic’s toll on veterans

Loneliness, isolation and interruptions in health-care services due to the COVID-19 pandemic have all contributed to a mental health toll on veterans.    In the first longitudinal survey examining the mental health of Canadian veterans during the pandemic, a research team representing 10 universities and research centres recruited 1,139 veterans for an online health and well-being survey and followup every three months for a year and a half.  More than half of respondents reported their mental health worsened during the pandemic, reported Don Richardson, medical director of the Parkwood Institute’s Operational Stress Injury Clinic in London, Ont., at the 2021 Canadian Institute for Military and Veteran Health Research Forum.  “Preliminary results show that about 56 per cent reported w...
CIMVHR forum highlights hidden health research possibilities
Health, Military Health Matters

CIMVHR forum highlights hidden health research possibilities

An explosion of knowledge has occurred since the Canadian Institute for Military and Veteran Health Research was founded a little more than a decade ago. With a network of about 1,700 researchers across dozens of universities in Canada, CIMVHR has produced significant research in support of veterans, serving military and their families. This knowledge has been used to help doctors diagnose problems, establish severity and propose solutions.The organization has contributed to disseminating this knowledge through its annual forums, which have been held virtually during the pandemic. Well done, all. But they could be doing better, suggests a group of CIMVHR researchers who shone the spotlight on the work itself this year, revealing some significant gaps in what is studied and how. The grou...

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