Day: November 10, 2021

Lytton Branch destroyed by wildfire
News, Our Veterans

Lytton Branch destroyed by wildfire

Lytton, B.C., was devastated by wildfire on June 30.  The hospital, ambulance station and pharmacy were destroyed.The bank, museum, coffee shop, both grocery stores, all gone. And with them, Lytton Branch of The Royal Canadian Legion.  “It’s going to be a challenge,” said Branch President Sheila Maguire in an interview with Legion Magazine  in August. “But we’ll forge on.” It won’t be easy. It won’t be cheap. And it won’t be fast.  The outer walls of the building have collapsed. “We won’t be salvaging anything,” Maguire said. At the end of August she was sorting out insurance issues, too busy to think too far ahead. But she hopes a new building is in the future for the branch, a meeting place for the town’s 250 or so residents and about 2,500 people who live up and down the valley. ...
Thayendanegea’s legacy
Military History, Military Milestones

Thayendanegea’s legacy

This week, between Indigenous Veterans Day on Nov. 8 and Remembrance Day on Nov. 11, and after observance of the first Truth and Reconciliation Day, it seems fitting to remember one of the country’s first Indigenous military heroes, a man honoured by his own people, colonial allies and Europeans in the 18th century. His traditional name translates to “he who places two bets” or “two sticks bound together for strength”—but his tree of life has so many branches it’s difficult to know which two character traits combined to give him such a strong personality. Warrior/diplomat? Loyalist/rebel? Perhaps it was thriving within two cultures, reflected in the fact he is remembered by two names: Thayendanegea/Joseph Brant. He was a distinguished military leader and accomplished diplomat, an ...
Too young—and too old—to join the fight
Defence Today, Front Lines

Too young—and too old—to join the fight

Clifford Robinson Oulton was just 14 years old and baby-faced when he walked into a recruiting office in Moncton, N.B., on Feb. 1, 1916. The Great War was raging in France, Belgium and beyond and young Clifford wanted to be a part of it. Oulton was technically still a child who, by the looks of him, wasn’t yet shaving. His father George, a railroad pipefitter, had died. He’d lost a brother in 1909. His mother Dora and four sisters lived just outside of town, in Bridgedale. Times were tough, no doubt. Oulton’s army medical history demanded to know “when vaccinated last.” The doctor who conducted his physical examination, a major, wrote “when a child.” Weighing 120 pounds and standing five-foot-four-and-a-half-inches tall, Oulton was technically still a child who, by the looks of him...

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