Day: November 3, 2021

Lessons to learn
Defence Today, Eye On Defence

Lessons to learn

The fall of Afghanistan prompts a tough question: “Was it worth it?”   The Afghanistan government of Ashraf Ghani collapsed in mid-August and the Taliban, which harboured the 9/11 terrorists, now reigns supreme over the troubled country.  The 9/11 attacks led directly to the invocation of NATO’s Article 5—the collective security clause—which led Canada directly into the war in Afghanistan in the fall of 2001. Now, after 20 years of fighting, the war has been lost. The extreme Islamist group rules again. It is easy to blame the collapse of the Ghani government on President Joe Biden’s hasty withdrawal of the remaining American troops from Afghanistan, but Canadians also have tough questions to answer about what we were doing there in the first place.   Canada sent more than ...
Eternal poppy
Editorial, Our Veterans

Eternal poppy

The bleak, muddy terrain of Western Europe during the First World War was trenched, scarred, bombed and cratered into oblivion. Tides of battle flowed back and forth across the front, and the ground and greenery were scorched by shellfire and poisoned by gas. Soldiers and horses, irretrievable, decomposed in the muck. It seemed nothing could exist here. Only death. But amid the chaos and carnage, bright red poppies sprouted and blossomed in no man’s land and among the graves of the fallen. Soldiers grasped at the glimmer of hope they saw in the determined wildflower: if it could rise from the morass, they surely could too. One soldier in particular—John McCrae, a Canadian doctor serving in Belgium’s Flanders region in 1915—was so moved by the battlefield death of a friend that he set t...
Viking settlement predates latest discovery: archeologist
Defence Today, Front Lines

Viking settlement predates latest discovery: archeologist

“We don’t know how long before and after they were there.” A co-author of a groundbreaking study that pinpointed Viking activity in North America to the summer of 1021 AD says Norse explorers likely arrived at the Newfoundland site years before they cut the wood on which the finding was based. Longtime Parks Canada archeologist Birgitta Wallace, one of the world’s foremost experts on Vikings (Norse) on this continent, said the finding using a new form of radiocarbon dating may well represent the last year the Norse explorers spent at L’Anse aux Meadows on Newfoundland’s Great Northern Peninsula. “It’s slightly later than we would have expected,” Wallace said in an interview with Legion Magazine. “We have one date, but we don’t know how long before and after they were there. “Fr...
Setting an exact border
Military History, Military Milestones

Setting an exact border

Canada and the United States famously share the longest undefended border in the world—but the exact location of that border has been in dispute many times. One of those disputes ended with Yukon being cut off from sea access by the Alaska Panhandle. It’s a border dispute that Canada lost more than a century ago that has ramifications reverberating to this day. It began with an accord between Russia and Britain that was established before the northwest part of North America had been fully explored and mapped. Both Russia and Britain had colonial interests in the territories today known as Alaska and British Columbia. The two countries signed a treaty in 1825 delineating the border between their territories. The agreement said the border would travel north along Portland Canal t...

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