Day: July 26, 2021

Shot-up polecat
Artifacts, Military History

Shot-up polecat

How a routine mission in Croatia turned critical A battered and bullet-riddled white utility vehicle on display at the Canadian War Museum is testament to the time when the world began to understand that peacekeeping is not a peaceful profession. While on a peacekeeping mission in Croatia, two Canadian soldiers were shot multiple times as they rode in this four-wheel-drive Bombardier Iltis. (Iltis is German for polecat). Nearly 60 bullet holes pepper the vehicle, clearly marked UN. There are bullet holes through the back of the driver’s seat and the windshield has webs of shattered glass, each with a hole in the centre, marking shots taken at the soldiers’ heads.    Since 1991, when Yugoslavia began to break up along ethnic and religious lines, about 40,000 Canadians have ser...
Valour Games set for 2022
News, Our Veterans

Valour Games set for 2022

Canada’s first Valour Games, a homegrown project created after Toronto hosted the 2017 Invictus Games for wounded veterans and service members, are set to launch in Ottawa in November 2022. The games are to be held every two years in select Canadian cities. Some 500 competitors are expected.  The weeklong competition is to feature 10 adaptive sports, including archery, powerlifting, wheelchair tennis, rugby and basketball. “Canada’s Valour Games are much more than elite competition—they are a vital part of the rehabilitation journey for Canada’s ill and injured warriors,” reads the Valour Games’ website. “Many Canadians may not know the extent of the physical and emotional trauma service members undergo while serving our country, or the extraordinary burdens placed on their families. ...
King’s postwar trip
Military History, Military Milestones

King’s postwar trip

In 1946, the Canadian prime minister attended a peace conference, visited battlefields and witnessed the Nuremberg trials Canada had played a significant and substantial role in the victory of the democracies over Nazism and fascism, and 1945 was a year of triumphs for Prime Minister Mackenzie King and his nation.  Canada also was fully represented at the United Nations Conference on International Organization in San Francisco in the spring of 1945, and Ottawa’s fight to prevent the Security Council from deploying Canadian troops without Ottawa’s permission led to Article 44 in the UN Charter forbidding such action.  King himself was present for most of the meetings, something that greatly benefited him and his Liberal party in the June general elections, which the government party na...

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