Day: July 14, 2021

The key is adaptability
Editorial, Our Veterans

The key is adaptability

Kudos are in order. For the past 16 months—the COVID era—The Royal Canadian Legion has made every effort to prevent interruption to the services it provides to veterans, and it has shown remarkable adaptability. Back in the pre-pandemic days, Legion branches served as second homes to many in communities across Canada. Places to gather in groups, socialize, reminisce, grumble, throw darts, get support—and do good work for others. Branches generate new members and new revenue. And they are fundamental to the grassroots federalist model by which the Legion operates. Thank goodness it won’t be much longer before they are all reopened and operating at capacity.  But looking back, the lockdown closure of branches dealt quite a body blow to the core of this national institution.  Digital ini...
Jerry Potts and the March West
Military History, Military Milestones

Jerry Potts and the March West

In September 1874, a North West Mounted Police patrol heading west to Fort Whoop-Up to rein in the violence of the whiskey trade, hired Métis scout and interpreter Jerry Potts. For the next 22 years he was an invaluable asset to the force, arguably as responsible for the peaceful settlement of the West as the Mounties he served. Potts was born with each foot in a different, dangerous world, that of his mother, a Kainai (Blackfoot) woman who named him Ky-yo-kosi, or Bear Child, and his Scottish fur trader father. In childhood Potts moved between both worlds. With the Blackfoot he learned to track and hunt and became a formidable warrior; with his adoptive father he travelled between trading posts, learning several Indigenous languages, acting as a cultural go-between and becoming f...
Unforgettable Ian tells the story of a soldier’s battle with dementia
News, Our Veterans

Unforgettable Ian tells the story of a soldier’s battle with dementia

Unforgettable Ian is a bittersweet mini-documentary about a dementia-sufferer, Ian Doig; his devoted wife Kathie Reid; and the front-line workers who care for him. Written and directed by Rhiana Ehara, the film tells the story of the long-retired army officer and his struggles with aging, change and short-term memory loss.   Doig is an endearing subject—an accomplished man forced to confront the vulnerabilities and consequences that the years have wrought. That he does so with such grace, humour and fortitude is inspiring. He came to the Revera Stoneridge Manor long-term care home in Carleton Place, Ont., three years ago after a bad fall. As is often the case, it was a difficult transition for all involved. Doig was subsequently diagnosed with dementia. “I don’t know why I’m here ...
A glimmer of hope for Afghan interpreters left behind
Defence Today, Front Lines

A glimmer of hope for Afghan interpreters left behind

The U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan has profound implications for more than 100 Afghans believed to have worked alongside Canadian troops during the years they operated inside the country’s borders. The American pullout has refocused attention on the plight of an estimated 115 so-called LECs (locally employed civilians) who missed out on a brief resettlement program instituted by the former Conservative government. Taliban fighters have executed numerous interpreters and other collaborators. Several news organizations, including Reuters, The Globe and Mail and The National Post, quoted government sources in reporting that Ottawa plans to evacuate hundreds of collaborators and their families after President Joe Biden said he would bring up to 100,000 Afghans to the United States, incl...

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