Day: July 6, 2021

Dominion convention in August to be virtual
News, Our Veterans

Dominion convention in August to be virtual

Originally planned to take place in Saskatoon, The Royal Canadian Legion’s 48th dominion convention will be conducted by video conference on Aug. 13-15 this year.  The decision was based on the safety of Legion members, predictive factors associated with the pandemic and restrictions imposed on the convention facilities, said Steven Clark, executive director of National Headquarters. Delegates from Legion commands, sections and branches will convene online to make policy decisions and set the future course of the organization.  This may pose a challenge to some, but current technology should ease the process, said Clark. The internet browser Google Chrome will be used and a minimum 5 megabits-per-second internet download speed is required. The 14-page convention call was distributed on...
DEC focuses on support to branches
News, Our Veterans

DEC focuses on support to branches

At its meeting via video conference on April 24-25, Dominion Executive Council (DEC) considered the many impacts of COVID-19 on The Royal Canadian Legion in recent months. A common theme through the meeting was how the Legion has responded to the pandemic and its plans for a post-pandemic future.  “Branches stepped up to the plate to offer their spaces for vaccination and testing.” “A top priority of the RCL in the past year has been to help many branches, in serious financial difficulty because of the lockdowns, avoid permanent closure,” said Grand President Larry Murray. “Dominion Command initially provided relief using national reserves to the extent feasible and then successfully sought assistance from government for the first time in the Legion’s nearly 100-year history. The sup...
Cracking the Enigma
Military History, Military Milestones

Cracking the Enigma

During the Second World War the Germans used a machine for sending coded signals. The Allies called it Enigma (Greek for riddle). Each branch of the German services developed its own version, but at the heart of them all was a set of five to eight interchangeable rotors that continuously scrambled the letters of the alphabet. There were 103 sextillion possible settings—that’s 103 with 21 zeroes behind it. Starting positions of the rotors were changed with each message and the machines were reset every day, according to a key list distributed monthly. The Germans thought the codes were unbreakable. They were wrong. But to break the code, the Allies needed an Enigma machine. In May 1941, they got one. The Royal Navy captured a U-boat in the North Atlantic, recovering its Enigma m...

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