Day: May 11, 2021

The Battle of the St. Lawrence
Military History, Military Milestones

The Battle of the St. Lawrence

In May 1942, the houses of a fishing village on the north shore of the Gaspé Peninsula were rocked so violently residents believed there had been an earthquake. But it was a different sort of ground-shaking event: the beginning of the Battle of the St. Lawrence, which would rage in Canadian home waters for more than two years. Rushing to the seaside, some residents of Cloridorme, Que., could see offshore lights vanish in the black of the night: German submarine U-553. In early May 1942 Kapitänleutnant Karl Thurmann guided the U-boat from the Gulf of St. Lawrence into the wide mouth of the river. It was the sub’s seventh patrol. In the previous 11 months, it had sunk five ships and damaged one. On May 10, the sub was spotted off the Gaspé coast, but eluded bombs dropped by a Roy...
A Black soldier at the Somme
Defence Today, Front Lines

A Black soldier at the Somme

James Munroe Franklin was among the first Black Canadians to enlist in the Canadian Expeditionary Force and, six months before the Americans joined the fight, he is believed to be the first Black North American killed in action in the First World War. He served in the Ontario-based 76th and 4th battalions and died four days shy of his 17th birthday at Regina Trench during the Battle of the Ancre Heights. His family left his native Whitaker, Miss., and crossed the Canadian border in 1901, settling in Hamilton, safe from America’s Jim Crow South. He was just seven when his mother Angeline died during pregnancy. His father, Walter Van Twiller Abraham Franklin, worked as a farmer and an inventor and was credited with inventing the original keyboard chromatic harp. He raised his son a ...
Panellists condemn sexual misconduct and extremism in military
News

Panellists condemn sexual misconduct and extremism in military

Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan joined a chorus of in-house critics at the Ottawa Conference on Security and Defence in March, calling sexual misconduct allegations plaguing the military “deeply troubling” and promising to create an independent reporting structure for victims.   “Let me be clear,” said Sajjan, “any harassment, discrimination, or sexual misconduct at any rank in any element—military or civilian—is completely unacceptable. “It makes us less-effective allies and partners. It erodes the confidence that people have in our organizations. And, most importantly, it harms those who have chosen to serve our country.” Sajjan’s comments came at the outset of his address to a virtual panel on NATO and United Kingdom/Canada co-operation, part of the three-day annual conference prese...
How to apply for the CAF/DND Sexual Misconduct Class Action Settlement
Serving You

How to apply for the CAF/DND Sexual Misconduct Class Action Settlement

Recently the media has reported on sexual harassment, sexual assault and discrimination on the grounds of sex, gender, gender identity or sexual orientation in the Canadian military. The barriers to reporting such experiences have been acknowledged and include fear of retaliation or consequences to professional development. The Canadian Armed Forces (CAF)–Department of National Defence (DND) Sexual Misconduct Class Action Settlement, approved by the Federal Court on Nov. 25, 2019, will provide financial compensation to current and former members of the CAF, current and former civilian employees, and staff of Non-Public Funds, Canadian Forces. It also provides the option for participation in a restorative engagement program to share personal experiences and effect change in CAF and Veteran...
Panel to report on racism
News

Panel to report on racism

On Dec. 17, the Department of National Defence announced the creation of an advisory panel to report on systemic racism and discrimination in the ranks of the Canadian Armed Forces. The panel has a wide mandate to investigate systemic racism and discrimination and report by the end of the year on how to end systemic discrimination and unconscious bias. The panel is made up of four veterans and is titled the Advisory Panel on Systemic Racism, Discrimination, LGBTQ2 Prejudice, Gender Bias and White Supremacy. It includes one of the first female infantry officers, retired major Sandra Perron, who wrote about abuse and discrimination during her military career; Derek Montour, who left the Canadian military after the Oka Crisis and became a U.S. marine sergeant; retired captain D.L Gibson of ...

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