NEW! Canadian Military History Trivia Challenge

Day: March 1, 2021

Gulf War aftermath
Military History

Gulf War aftermath

As soon as the bloodbath in the Kuwaiti desert ended, Canadian oil-well firefighters and BOMB disposal experts stepped up Mike Miller figures there are three main reasons why his Calgary-based company, Safety Boss, put out more oil well fires than any other crew working in postwar Kuwait in 1991: the Canadians were mobile; they used chemicals instead of explosives to quell the fires; and they were colour-blind. Safety Boss put out 180 of somewhere between 605 and 732 oil-well fires lit by Saddam Hussein’s troops as they evacuated occupied Kuwait and ran from coalition forces during the 43-day war to liberate the petroleum-rich country. When the fighting was over, the firefighting began. Safety Boss was one of the original four firms dispatched to battle one of the century’s worst ...
Broken Arrow
Canada Corner, Military History

Broken Arrow

Brilliant and blazingly fast, the CF-105 was ahead of its time—and short-lived During the height of the Cold War in the 1950s, there was a growing concern that Soviet bombers would attack North America via the shortest route, over the Canadian Arctic. NATO intelligence suggested that such an attack could occur as early as 1954. So, in 1953, the Royal Canadian Air Force commissioned the A.V. Roe Canada Ltd. aircraft manufacturing company in Malton, Ont., to design and build a fighter plane that could operate in any weather, fly at twice the speed of sound, execute a 2G turn at 50,000 feet without losing speed or altitude, and fire a missile at oncoming bombers. It was, at the time, the most demanding specification in the world, and many international manufacturers believed it couldn’t...
Into the Fire
HISTORICPHOTOBLOG, Military History, Pictorial

Into the Fire

As the Korean winter gave way to an early spring and UN forces pushed slowly but steadily north, the PPCLI were sorely tested in mountain fighting, ambushes and Chinese hit-and-run attacks NORTH KOREA, supported by the Soviet Union and China, invaded South Korea in June 1950. Canada answered the United Nations’ call to support South Korea.  The 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, arrived in December 1950, joining the ground war after eight weeks of training in mountain warfare and small unit tactics. The Royal Canadian Regiment (RCR) and the Royal 22nd Regiment (Van Doos) followed later.  The war was one of continual patrols and a series of fierce battles to take or retain strategic hilltops. Ambush and fighting patrols were called ‘snatch’ and ‘jitter’ pat...
Crater Raiders
Military History

Crater Raiders

The Battle of Saint Eloi Craters in April 1916 was a gruesome disaster for the 2nd Division. In early 1916, skilful British tunnellers worked hard to plant huge mines deep under German trenches. They blew them up in the Ypres Salient in Belgium on March 2, and the battle to control the resulting craters went on for some two weeks.  The commander of the British brigade finally pulled his men back to their original line, telling his headquarters that there was no point in holding the muddy interior of craters, as they were an obvious target for artillery. That was sound advice, but General Herbert Plumer, commanding Second British Army, ignored it, and his tunnellers planted 31,000 kilograms of ammonal under the German trenches at Saint Eloi, five kilometres south of Ypres. Six mine...

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An informative primer on Canada’s crucial role in the Normandy landing, June 6, 1944.